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LETTER

TO

SIR SAMUEL ROMILLY, M. P.

FROM

HENRY BROUGHAM, ESQ. M. P. F. R.S.

UPON THE

ABUSE OF CHARITIES.

“Whoever will examine the state of Grammar Schools in different parts of this kingdom, will see to what a lamentable condition most of them are reduced. If all persons had equally done their duty, we should not find, as is now the case, empty walls without scholars, and every thing neglected but the receipt of the salaries and emoluments."

Per Lord Kenyon, C. J. 6 T. R. 493.

“It is absolutely necessary, that it should be perfectly understood, that Charity Estates all over the kingdom are dealt with in a manner most grossly improvident; amounting to the most direct breach of trust.”

Per Lord Eldon, C. 18 Ves. 580..

NINTH EDITION.

LONDON:

VOL. XIII.

Pam.

NO. XXV.

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MY DEAR FRIEND, I

HAVE resolved to throw together in a letter, several facts and observations respecting the abuse of charities, and especially respecting the bill, which, as chairman of the education committee, I introduced into parliament last session. I prefer this mode of bringing the matter before the public, to making a statement in my place; because I shall in my own justification be under the necessity of touching upon several things personal to myself, and which I should therefore most unwillingly obtrude upon the house, whose kind indulgence, as I often experience it, I am very reluctant to abuse. It seems also material, that the subject should be fairly laid before the country without waiting for the meeting of parliament, which may not take place until after Christmas.

Whoever has been permitted by the courtesy of the house, or authorised by the appointment of a committee, to undertake the management of any important legislative measure, is responsible, in the first instance, for its success; and if he has, by influence which he could not resist, been prevented from pursuing his object in his own way, he owes to himself the duty of shewing to whom the blame of the failure belongs. Yet I hardly think I should have been induced to give this explanation in the present case, had the comparatively insignificant question of my own conduct been alone involved in it. My belief is, that great as the errors are which have been committed, some good may yet be attained by directing the public attention to the proceedings under the act; while, at all events, the defects of that measure, and of the steps already taken to execute it, can only be supplied by a full discussion of the whole subject.

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