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" A quibble is the golden apple for which he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight that he was content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth.... "
The Dramatick Writings of Will. Shakspere: With the Notes of All the Various ... - Página 126
por William Shakespeare - 1788
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volumen1

William Shakespeare - 1839
...apple for which he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight, that...which he lost the world, and was content to lose it.) For his other deviations from the art of writing, I resign him to critical justice, without making...
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Burtons' Gentleman's Magazine and American Monthly Review, Volumen5

1839
...that if he did, the strong pleasure of evolving his own personal impressions was " the fatal Capua for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it." Shakspeare manages the matter differently ; he never describes the appearance of his heroines, but...
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The Monthly chronicle; a national journal, Volumen5

1840
...peculiarities he has in common with his great predecessor, as for instance his " puns," the Cleopatras for which he lost the world and was content to lose it — our author has one which rivals the ovn; of Homer or the "Roam hither then" of Shakspeare. Lord...
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-III

William Shakespeare - 1841
...apple for which he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight, that...will be thought strange, that, in enumerating the defect* of this writer, 1 have not yet mentioned his neglect of the unities; his violation of those...
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A letter to John Murray, Esq., upon an aesthetic edition of the works of ...

Spencer Hall - 1841
...symbols of intellectual worship. May I be permitted also to add one question as to his quibbles—" the fatal Cleopatra. for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it." Allow the custom of the age ; admit the propensity of the writer. But are they all his own ? Are none...
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The Plays and Poems of Shakespeare,: According to the Improved ..., Volumen1

William Shakespeare - 1844
...apple for which he will always turn aside from his career, or stoop from his elevation. A quibble, poor and barren as it is, gave him such delight, that...that, in enumerating the defects of this writer, I hare not yet mentioned his neglect of the unities ; his violation of those laws which have been instituted...
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English poets

Henry Francis Cary - 1846
...defended him from the neglect of what are called the unities. The observation, that a quibble was the Cleopatra for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it, is more pointed than just. Shakspeare cannot be said to have lost the world ; for his fame has not...
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The King's College Magazine, Volumen2

1842
...career, or stoop from his elevation. A pun, poor and barren as it is, gives him such delight, that he is content to purchase it by the sacrifice of reason, propriety, and truth. He resembles the cat, which, according to ^Esop's fable, was transformed into a lady, and for a time...
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Essays: Selected from Contributions to the Edinburgh Review, Volumen1

Henry Rogers - 1850
...what was absurdly said of Shakspeare, might with some propriety be said of him, ' that a pun was the Cleopatra for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it.' In a moral and religious point of view, the character of Fuller is entitled to our veneration, and...
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REASON AND FAITH, AND OTHER MISCELLANIES OF HENRY ROGERS

1853
...what was absurdly said of Shakspeare, might with some propriety be said of him, " that a pun was the Cleopatra for which he lost the world, and was content to lose it." In a moral and religious point of view, the character of Fuller is entitled to our veneration, and...
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