Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Libros Libros
" As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. "
Professional Ethics Education: Studies in Compassionate Empathy - Página 56
por Bruce Maxwell - 2008 - 198 páginas
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

The Compassionate Temperament: Care and Cruelty in Modern Society

Natan Sznaider - 2001 - 129 páginas
...place of those who suffer. One has to imagine how one would feel in another's place. As Smith wrote: as we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Presenting Women Philosophers

Cecile Thérèse Tougas, Sara Ebenreck - 2000 - 266 páginas
...same ease that it is achieved for Mme Condorcet. The following is Smith's formulation of sympathy: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation . . . our senses will never inform us of what he suffers. They never did, and never can, carry us beyond...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Naturalization of the Soul: Self and Personal Identity in the Eighteenth Century

Raymond Martin, John Barresi - 2004 - 203 páginas
...accounting for the mechanics of sympathy, which he did mainly by commenting on examples. He said that since 'we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation'. If 'our brother is upon the rack', he said, we discover what he suffers not by our senses, which cannot...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Knowledge, Truth, and Duty: Essays on Epistemic Justification ...

Matthias Steup - 2001 - 272 páginas
...instead an old idea of "empathy" or "sympathy," which Adam Smith had explained in the following way: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses ... never...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

How the Dismal Science Got Its Name: Classical Economics and the Ur-text of ...

David M. Levy - 2002 - 320 páginas
...of situation; consequently, they have no warrant to judge other minds or other utility functions:6 As we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. (9) Seeing the Partial Spectator In the first chapter of Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith gives a...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Publishing the Family

June Howard - 2001 - 336 páginas
...conjure a resolution of the dilemma posed by the increasingly individualist topography of the self: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

The Hauerwas Reader

Stanley Hauerwas - 2001 - 729 páginas
...derive sorrow from the sorrow of others. Still, according to Smith, this is something of a puzzle. Since we have no "immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Is the Present the Key to the Past Or is the Past the Key to the ..., Tema 355

A. M. Celâl ?engör - 2001 - 51 páginas
...completely known. In the second paragraph of the book, Smith ( 1756[1976], p. 9) pointed out the following: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in like situation. Although our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Common Ground: Eighteenth-Century English Satiric Fiction and the Poor

Judith Frank - 2002 - 230 páginas
...invisible: the soul. Interestingly, Smith's The Theory of Moral Sentiments opens with the body on the rack: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Intersubjectivity in Economics: Agents and Structures

Edward Fullbrook - 2002 - 306 páginas
...matter as it does in modern neoclassical theory. For, because of this lack of immediate experience, "we can form no idea of the manner in which they are...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation" (TMS 1.1.1.2). Thus the mistake of those who see incomparability of sensations as an impediment to...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro




  1. Mi biblioteca
  2. Ayuda
  3. Búsqueda avanzada de libros