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" As we have no immediate experience of what other men feel, we can form no idea of the manner in which they are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. "
Professional Ethics Education: Studies in Compassionate Empathy - Página 56
por Bruce Maxwell - 2008 - 198 páginas
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The Plight of Feeling: Sympathy and Dissent in the Early American Novel

Julia A. Stern - 2008 - 320 páginas
...workings of vision and imagination, the ability to leave oneself behind in order to take another's part: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never...
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Religion and Faction in Hume's Moral Philosophy

Jennifer A. Herdt - 1997 - 300 páginas
...affirming, like Johnson, that sympathy involves imagining what we would feel in the situation of another: 72 [A]s we have no immediate experience of what other...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never...
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Rewriting the Self: Histories from the Renaissance to the Present

SUSAN S. PORTER - 1997 - 283 páginas
...appeared.' Smith's own opening chapter lets us see why empiricism led to this emphasis on 'sympathy'. 'As we have no immediate experience of what other...no idea of the manner in which they are affected. hut hy conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like simation.' Sympathy rescues us from solipsism...
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States of Sympathy: Seduction and Democracy in the American Novel

Elizabeth Barnes - 1997 - 152 páginas
...sympathize with them. However, since Smith has also claimed that we can never know what someone else feels "but by conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation," it follows that our only hope of discerning another person's judgment is by putting ourselves in ft...
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Distant Suffering: Morality, Media and Politics

Luc Boltanski - 1999 - 246 páginas
...Setting, Frankfurt-on-Main Adam Smith's Science of Morals, Verlag Peter Lang, l986. 8. Campbell, p. 95. 9. 'As we have no immediate experience of what other...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation' (The Theory of Moral Sentiments, p. 9); 'Every faculty in one man is the measure by which he judges...
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Adam Smith and the Virtues of Enlightenment

Charles L. Griswold, Jr, Griswold, Jr. (Charles L.) - 1999 - 412 páginas
...could not possibly experience. Let us listen again to another of Smith's preliminary formulations: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation. . . . Neither can that faculty [of imagination] help us to this any other way, than by representing...
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The Wealth of Nations, Libros 1-3

Adam Smith - 1982 - 537 páginas
...doing this, we stand in the relation of bystander or spectator, and Smith was careful to argue that, 'As we have no immediate experience of what other...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation.' (Iii2.) An expression of sympathy (broadly defined) for others thus involves an act of reflection and...
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Moral Imagination and Management Decision-making

Patricia Hogue Werhane - 1999 - 146 páginas
...fortune of others" (Ii1.1). One of these "principles" is sympathy. At the same time, Smith says that "[a]s we have no immediate experience of what other...what we ourselves should feel in the like situation" (1759/1976,1.1.2). In Smith's technical use of the term, sympathy is neither empathy nor any other...
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A History of Philosophy, Volumen5

Frederick Copleston - 1999 - 440 páginas
...humane; it is found in all men to some degree. Smith explains sympathy in terms of the imagination. 'As we have no immediate experience of what other...conceiving what we ourselves should feel in the like situation.'3 When we sympathize with someone's great pain, 'by the imagination we place ourselves in...
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Representations of Emotions

Jürgen Schlaeger - 1999 - 183 páginas
...other's situation excites in us a similar emotion, although weaker in degree. This is how he explains it: As we have no immediate experience of what other men...are affected, but by conceiving what we ourselves would feel in the like situation. Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are...
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