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" Let me play the fool : With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come, . And let my liver rather heat with wine Than my heart cool with mortifying groans. Why should a man, whose blood is warm within, Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster... "
Analytic Elocution Containing Studies, Theoretical and Practical, of ... - Página 341
por James Edward Murdoch - 1884 - 504 páginas
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1824 - 830 páginas
...world but as the world, Gratiano ; A stage, where every man must play apart, And mine a sad one. Gra. F ; Ant let my liver rather heat with wine, Than my heart cool withmortifvinggroans. Why should a man,...
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A dictionary of quotations from the British poets, by the author ..., Volumen1

British poets - 1824
...short as December; . And, with his varying childness, cures inme Thoughts that would thick my blood. Let me play the fool : With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles cojnef Aud IK my liver lather heat with fyine, mi _ __ i L • • "" ''' And then the old quire hold...
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The Works of Shakspeare: From the Text of Johnson, Steevens, and Reed

William Shakespeare - 1825 - 896 páginas
...but as the world, Gratiano ; A stage, where every man must play a part. And mine a sad one. <•': : ballad 垏 nke his grandsire cut in alabaster ! Sleep, when he wakes 1 and creep into the jaundice By being peevish?...
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The Juvenile Mentor; Or, Select Readings ...

Albert Picket - 1825 - 262 páginas
...worthy fool ! Motley's the only wear. Raillery. Let me play the fool With mirth and laughter ; so let wrinkles come, And let my liver rather heat with wine,...warm within, Sit like his grandsire cut in alabaster f Sleep when he wakes, and creep into the jaundice By being peevish ? I tell thee what, Antonio, (I...
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Shakespeare's Universe of Discourse: Language-Games in the Comedies

Keir Elam, William Shakespeare - 1984 - 339 páginas
...world but as the world Gratiano, A stage, where every man must play a part, And mine a sad one. Gra. Let me play the fool, With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come, . . . 69 There are a sort of men whose visages Do cream and mantle like a stand1ng pond, . . . As who...
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Ideology of Adventure: Studies in Modern Consciousness, 1100-1750, Volumen1

Michael Nerlich - 1987 - 272 páginas
...like Antonio, who has none, mourn for such a semblance? Using himself as an example, Gratiano says: Let me play the fool! With mirth and laughter let...alabaster, Sleep when he wakes, and creep into the jaundice By being peevish? 1 tell thee what, Antonio — 1 love thee, and it is my love that speaks — There...
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An Audition Handbook of Great Speeches

Jerry Blunt - 1990 - 207 páginas
...swollen self-esteem. There is laughter, mockery and sincerity in abundance in this speech. Gratiano: Let me play the fool: With mirth and laughter let...alabaster? Sleep when he wakes, and creep into the jaundice By being peevish? I tell thee what, Antonio — I love thee, and it is my love that speaks — There...
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Shakespeare's Comic Commonwealths

Camille Wells Slights - 1993 - 290 páginas
...Solanio's account of men of 'vinegar aspect' and Gratiano's rhetori128 Change and Continuity cal query: 'Why should a man, whose blood is warm within, / Sit like his grandsire cut in alablaster?' (li83-4). Although Portia is similarly disdainful, her extended flight of wit is less...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1996 - 1263 páginas
...but as the world, Gratiano; A stage, where every man must play a part, And mine a sad one. GRATIANO. ʐ 慔 V BY p; " have sent forth Shall bring this prize in very easily. To comfor By being peevish? I tell thee what, Antonio, — I love thee, and it is my love that speaks, — There...
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Merchant of Venice, The by William Shakespeare (MAXnotes)

...to be so grave about worldly affairs, but rather "With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come,/. ..Why should a man whose blood is warm within/ Sit like his grandsire.../...And creep into the jaundice/ By being peevish?" In other words, he suggests Antonio...
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