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" How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. "
Professional Ethics Education: Studies in Compassionate Empathy - Página 31
por Bruce Maxwell - 2008 - 198 páginas
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The Cambridge Companion to Adam Smith

Knud Haakonssen, Professor of Philosophy Knud Haakonssen - 2006 - 409 páginas
...to establish it. Why so? The answer is given in the opening words of The Theory of Moral Sentiments: How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. Of this kind is pity or compassion . . . this sentiment, like all the other original passions of human...
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Handbook of Contemporary Behavioral Economics: Foundations and Developments

Morris Altman - 2006 - 762 páginas
...understood there was another element to human nature that needed to be included in the economic framework: How selfish soever, man may be supposed, there are...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it. ... That we often derive sorrow from the sorrow of others, is a matter of fact too obvious to require...
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The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-century Philosophy, Volumen1

Knud Haakonssen - 2006 - 1407 páginas
...Thirty years earlier Adam Smith had said in the first paragraph of The Theory of Moral Sentiments: How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others, when we either...
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True to Our Feelings: What Our Emotions Are Really Telling Us

Robert C. Solomon, Quincy Lee Centennial Professor of Business and Philosophy Robert C Solomon - 2007 - 286 páginas
...Two millennia later, Adam Smith wrote, in his Theory of the Moral Sentiments, "How selfish so ever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others." Without compassion...
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Perfecting Friendship: Politics and Affiliation in Early American Literature

Ivy Schweitzer - 2006 - 276 páginas
..."principles" of sociability, later identified as the need for recognition, consolation, and approbation, "which interest him in the fortune of others, and...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it" (9). Smith establishes the importance — in fact, the dominance — of visuality and spectacle from...
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The Economy As an Evolving Complex System, III: Current Perspectives and ...

Lawrence E. Blume, Steven N. Durlauf - 2006 - 377 páginas
...brother Theo The heart has reasons that Reason knows nothing about. — Blaise Pascal, Pensees (1670) How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortunes of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it,...
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The Origin of Wealth: Evolution, Complexity, and the Radical Remaking of ...

Eric D. Beinhocker - 2006 - 527 páginas
...lead to social benefit. But in his other great work, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Smith also said, "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortunes of others."6 In other words, Smith took a more rounded view of human behavior, one that acknowledged...
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Medical Education: Past, Present, and Future : Handing on Learning

Kenneth Charles Calman - 2007 - 543 páginas
...begins to grow the tStfi century But why think. Why not trie the expt. 1 John Hunter to Edward Jenner How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...principles in his nature which interest him in the fortunes of others. And render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it...
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The Fair Tax Book: Saying Goodbye to the Income Tax and the IRS

Neal Boortz, John Linder - 2009 - 224 páginas
...economist Adam Smith wrote that man's nature "interests] him in the fortunes of others, and render[s] their happiness necessary to him, though he derive[s]...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it." In 1980, the top marginal tax rate was 70 percent. That means that every dollar at the margin that...
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Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations: A Story of Economic Discovery

David Warsh - 2006 - 426 páginas
...may be supposed, there are certainly some principles in his nature which interest him in the fortunes of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing except the pleasure of seeing it." Later in the book he adds, "The chief part of human happiness arises...
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