Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Libros Libros
" How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. "
Pioneers of Industrial Organization: How the Economics of Competition and ... - Página 26
editado por - 2007 - 352 páginas
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Price Theory and Applications: Decisions, Markets, and Information

Jack Hirshleifer, Amihai Glazer, David Hirshleifer - 2005 - 630 páginas
...Model of the Taste for Risk," Economic Inquiry, v. 17 (October 1979). 6 Indeed, Adam Smith also said: How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it. This is the opening sentence of The Theory of Moral Sentiments (17 '59). 7 This allegation has been...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Capitalism's Achilles Heel: Dirty Money and How to Renew the Free-Market System

Raymond W. Baker - 2005 - 288 páginas
...of the core characteristic of sympathy in human affairs in the first sentence of Moral Sentiments'. "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it."6 With the word "selfish," Smith acknowledges the self-centered school of thought but immediately...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Feminism Confronts Homo Economicus: Gender, Law, and Society

Martha Fineman, Terence Dougherty - 2005 - 515 páginas
...altruism. 33 The first sentence of The Theory of Moral Sentiments reads: "However selfish soever man may he supposed, there are evidently some principles in his...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it." 34 Nor did Alfred Marshall, arguably the most prestigious nineteenth-century economist, begin from...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

The Man of Feeling

Henry Mackenzie - 2005 - 224 páginas
...understanding, I understand the same faculty, excluding only our demonstrative and probable reasonings. others, and render their happiness necessary to him,...it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others, when we either see it, or are made to conceive it in a very...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Moral Sentiments and Material Interests: The Foundations of Cooperation in ...

Professor Emeritus of Economics University of Massachusetts and Adjunct Professor Department of Politics Herbert Gintis, Herbert Gintis, Samuel Bowles, Professor Faculty of Economics Samuel Bowles, Robert T. Boyd, Ernst Fehr, Professor of Economics and Director of the Institute for Empirical Research in Economics Ernst Fehr - 2005 - 404 páginas
...Sentiments, "there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortunes of others, and render their happiness necessary to...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it." His book is a thorough scrutiny of human behavior with the goal of establishing that "sympathy" is...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-century Philosophy, Volumen1

Knud Haakonssen - 2006 - 1407 páginas
...Thirty years earlier Adam Smith had said in the first paragraph of The Theory of Moral Sentiments: How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others, when we either see it, or are made to conceive it in a very...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

True to Our Feelings: What Our Emotions Are Really Telling Us

Robert C. Solomon, Quincy Lee Centennial Professor of Business and Philosophy Robert C Solomon - 2007 - 286 páginas
...Two millennia later, Adam Smith wrote, in his Theory of the Moral Sentiments, "How selfish so ever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles...it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others." Without compassion (sympathy), there would be no foundation...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

The Cambridge Companion to Adam Smith

Knud Haakonssen, Professor of Philosophy Knud Haakonssen - 2006 - 409 páginas
...philosophy casts itself as a response is set in the first sentence of The Theory of Moral Sentiments: "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it." Smith wants to oppose the view that we empathize with others only when we think it to our advantage...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

Handbook of Contemporary Behavioral Economics: Foundations and Developments

Morris Altman - 2006 - 762 páginas
...understood there was another element to human nature that needed to be included in the economic framework: How selfish soever, man may be supposed, there are...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it. ... That we often derive sorrow from the sorrow of others, is a matter of fact too obvious to require...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro

How to Take Advantage of the People Who Are Trying to Take Advantage of You ...

Joseph Stephen Breese Mores - 2006 - 203 páginas
...explaining that there is something in us that encourages us to give even when we don't stand to benefit. "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it." But we can't donate to charities or underprivileged countries if we are poor; we can do this because...
Vista previa limitada - Acerca de este libro




  1. Mi biblioteca
  2. Ayuda
  3. Búsqueda avanzada de libros