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Libros Libros 41 - 46 de 46 sobre The truth is, the characters of Shakspeare are so much the objects of meditation...
" The truth is, the characters of Shakspeare are so much the objects of meditation rather than of interest or curiosity as to their actions, that while we are reading any of his great criminal characters, — Macbeth, Richard, even lago, — we think not... "
The Works of Charles Lamb: In Two Parts - Página 22
por Charles Lamb - 1818
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William Shakespeare, King Lear

Susan Bruce - 1998 - 192 páginas
...or curiosity as to their actions that while we are reading any of his great criminal characters ... we think not so much of the crimes which they commit,...which prompts them to overleap those moral fences. . . . [S]o little do the actions [of Shakespeare's criminal characters] . . . affect us, that while...
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare on Stage

Stanley Wells, Sarah Stanton - 2002 - 322 páginas
...when we read the tragedies 'we think not so much of the crimes which [Shakespeare's villainous heroes] commit, as of the ambition, the aspiring spirit, the...intellectual activity, which prompts them to overleap these moral fences'. He goes on to argue that 'what we see upon a stage is body and bodily action:...
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Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate

Kamilla Elliott - 2003 - 302 páginas
...villains: . . . while we are reading any of his great criminal characters, - Macbeth, Richard, even lago, - we think not so much of the crimes which they commit,...which prompts them to overleap those moral fences . . . not an atom of all which is made perceivable in Mr. Cfibber]'s way of acting [Richard III] ....
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Focus on Macbeth

John Russell Brown - 2004 - 272 páginas
...actions, that while we are reading any of his great criminal characters - Macbeth, Richard, even lago, we think not so much of the crimes which they commit,...which prompts them to overleap those moral fences. Lamb was led to notice something especially significant in Macbeth - that the emphasis when we read...
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The Crisis of Action in Nineteenth-century English Literature

Stefanie Markovits - 2006 - 258 páginas
...that while we are reading any of his great criminal characters, — Macbeth, Richard, even Iago, — we think not so much of the crimes which they commit,...intellectual activity, which prompts them to overleap these moral fences. . . . But when we see these things represented the acts which they do are comparatively...
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the uarterly review

john murray - 1835
...actions, that while we are reading any of his great criminal characters—Macbeth, Richard, even lago—we think not so much of the crimes which they commit,...there is a certain fitness between his neck and the rope—he is the legitimate heir to the gallows; nobody who thinks at all can think of any alleviating...
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