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Libros Libros 11 - 20 de 28 sobre Great, verily, was the glory of the English tongue (An.-Sax.) before the Norman Conquest,...
" Great, verily, was the glory of the English tongue (An.-Sax.) before the Norman Conquest, in this, that the Old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any. "
A history of England in the lives of Englishmen - Página 273
por George Godfrey Cunningham - 1853
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Familiar Words, as Affecting the Conduct of England in 1855: Second series

David Urquhart - 1855
...Christian is to them the preparing of the way for a religion, of charity, and faith. " The old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any ; as, for example, the holy serrice of God, which the Latins called Religion, because it kindled the...
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Familiar words as affecting England and the English

David Urquhart - 1856
...Christian is to them the preparing of the way for a religion, of charity, and faith. "•The old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any ; as, for example, the holy service of God, which the Latins called Religion, because it kindled the...
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The effect of the misuse of familiar words on the character of men and the ...

David Urquhart - 1856 - 350 páginas
...Christian is to them the preparing of the way for a religion, of charity, and faith. " The old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue, without borrowing from any; as, for example, the holy service of God, which the Latins called Religion, because it kindled the...
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The Church of England quarterly review

1858
...ground of his admiration is one which is of a questionable character, " for," says he, " the old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind...in their own tongue, without borrowing from any." He then gives several examples. Religion Ean-fastness anchor hold. Gospel God's-spel God's speech....
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The new American cyclopædia, ed. by G. Ripley and C.A. Dana

American cyclopaedia - 1859
...Camden, " was the glory of tho English tongue before the Norman conquest, in this, that the old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue without borrowing from any." " Tho alteration in our tongue hath been brought about by the entrance of strangers, as Danes, Normans,...
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The New American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General ..., Volumen7

George Ripley, Charles Anderson Dana - 1859
...Camden, " was the glory of the English tongue before the Norman conquest, in this, that the old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue without borrowing from any." " The alteration in our tongue hath been brought about by the entrance of strangers, as Danes, Normans,...
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The New American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General ..., Volumen7

George Ripley, Charles Anderson Dana - 1859
...Camdcn, " was the glory of the English tongue before the Norman conquest, in this, that the old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue w ithout borrowing from any." " The alteration in our tongue hath been brought about by the entrance...
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Song of Solomon, in Twenty-four English Dialects ...

1862 - 522 páginas
...great, verily, was the glory of our tongue before the Norman Conquest, in this, that the Old English could express most aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue without borrowing from any." EK Additional Note. In a very scarce pamphlet which I have been fortunate enough to find, the use of...
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The English nation; or, A history of England in the lives of Englishmen

George Godfrey Cunningham - 1863
...John Hanvill, a monk of St Albans, was another writer who distinguished himself also in Latin verse ;* as was also Felix, a monk of Crowland. In the descriptions...express the various objects of religious veneration. Tims, the word gospel, which means literally God's speech, was used instead of evangelium, or any modern...
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Remains Concerning Britain

William Camden, John Philipot, Thomas Moule, Mark Antony Lower - 1870 - 446 páginas
...glory of our tongue, before the Norman Conqueft, in this — that the oldEnglilh could exprefs moft aptly all the conceits of the mind in their own tongue without borrowing from any. As for example : The holy fervice of God, which the Latins called Religion, becaufe it knitted the...
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