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" Or call up him that left half told The story of Cambuscan bold, no Of Camball, and of Algarsife, And who had Canace to wife, That owned the virtuous ring and glass, And of the wondrous horse of brass, On which the Tartar king did ride; And if aught else... "
The Muses' Bower,: Embellished with the Beauties of English Poetry - Página 120
por English poetry - 1809
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The Central literary magazine, Volumen4

Birmingham central literary assoc - 1879
...falsehood of those around them ; such were proper subjects for the pensive man's charmed contemplations. " And if aught else great bards beside In sage and solemn...enchantments drear, WHERE MORE is MEANT THAN MEETS THE EAR." Milton here recognises the fact that the divinest claim of the poet on the human mind is the...
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Melodious Guile: Fictive Pattern in Poetic Language

John Hollander - 1990 - 262 páginas
...glance at the following lines will lead to an answer as well as to the crucial and problematic line: And if aught else great Bards beside In sage and solemn...the ear. Thus night oft see me in thy pale career . . . The "great Bards" are only one, Spenser, the suppression of whose name is a very different matter...
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Eighteenth-century Modernizations from The Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer - 1991 - 263 páginas
...who had Canace to wife, That own'd the virtuous ring and glass; And of the wondrous horse of brass On which the Tartar king did ride; And if aught else great bards beside Or cloudless skies the coming Season show, Where more is meant than meets the ear. Thus, Night, oft...
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The Works of John Milton: With an Introduction and Bibliography

John Milton - 1994 - 486 páginas
...who had Canace to wife, That owned the virtuous ring and glass, And of the wondrous horse of brass On which the Tartar king did ride; And if aught else...enchantments drear, Where more is meant than meets the ear.75 120 Thus, Night, oft see me in thy pale career, Till civil-suited Morn appear, Not tricked and...
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Art of Darkness: A Poetics of Gothic

Anne Williams - 2009 - 319 páginas
...rereading the Book of Nature turned out to have some distinctly Gothic pages. The Nature of Gothic Of forests and enchantments drear, Where more is meant than meets the ear. John Milton "II Penseroso" (119-20) In looking at objects of Nature while I am thinking, as at...
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Something New

Anne Plumptre - 1996 - 349 páginas
...live there long. " Source unidentified. 5 "more was meant than met the ear. " Milton. // Penseroso: "In sage and solemn tunes have sung, / Of Tourneys...enchantments drear, / Where more is meant than meets the ear" (117-120). 6 the daughters of Parnassus. The Muses. Parnassus is a mountain in Greece which was...
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The Complete Fairy Tales

George MacDonald - 1999 - 354 páginas
...or subject matter, but rather to its narrative mode: "Great bards besides / In sage and solemn times have sung / Of tourneys and of trophies hung; / Of...enchantments drear, / Where more is meant than meets the ear." Adopting the tone of a professorial MacDonald lecturing to his Bedford College students, Mr....
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The Development of Arthurian Romance

Roger Sherman Loomis - 2000 - 199 páginas
...Reformation did these centuries-old tales of quest and conquest, of fairy loves and fatal passion, 'of tourneys and of trophies hung, of forests and...enchantments drear, where more is meant than meets the ear', go out of fashion. But not without leaving many permanent effects on life and literature. The...
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The Artist on the Artist

Harry Guest - 2000 - 462 páginas
...Penseroso, before extolling the chivalric romances culminating in The Faerie Queene which sing Of turneys, and of trophies hung, Of forests, and enchantments drear, Where more is meant than meets the ear he gives a glancing reference to Chaucer who left The Squire 's Tale unfinished. Shakespeare and...
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Ventures Into Childland: Victorians, Fairy Tales, and Femininity

U. C. Knoepflmacher - 2000 - 444 páginas
..."from no worse authority than John Milton: 'Great bards besides / In sage and solemn times have sung /.../Of forests and enchantments drear, /Where more is meant than meets the ear'" (AC, 54). Smith explicates his chosen touchstone: "Milton here refers to Spenser in particular,...
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