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Libros Libros 41 - 50 de 55 sobre Entire, complete. — A thing is entire, by wanting none of its parts ; complete,...
" Entire, complete. — A thing is entire, by wanting none of its parts ; complete, by wanting none of the appendages that belong to it. A man may have an entire house to himself, and yet not have one complete apartment. "
Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres - Página 181
por Hugh Blair - 1793
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English Grammar: Adapted to the Different Classes of Learners with an ...

Lindley Murray - 1852
...Prudence, prevents our speaking or acting improperly. JSntire, complete. — A thing is entire, by war ting none of its parts : complete, by wanting none of the...appendages that belong to it. A man may have an entire house to himself, and yet not have one complete apartment. Surprised, astonished, amazed, confounded....
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Aids to English Composition: Prepared for Students of All Grades

Richard Green Parker - 1857
...improperly. Entire, complete. A thing is entire when it wants none of its parts ; complete when it wants none of the appendages that belong to it. A man may have an entire house to himself, and yet not have one complete apartment. Surprised, astonished, amazed, confounded....
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A new English grammar

Maurice D. Kavanagh - 1859
...difficulty embarrasses us ; an obstacle stops us. We remove a difficulty; we surmount an obstacle. ENTIRE, COMPLETE. — A thing is entire by wanting none of its parts ; complete by wanting none of its appendages. A man may occupy an entire house which has not one complete apartment. HAUGHTINESS,...
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The spelling-book supersede, or A new and easy method of teaching the ...

Robert Sullivan - 1860
...makes us happy," imports that virtue, by itself, or unaccompanied with other advantages, is sufficient to do it. Entire, complete. — A thing is entire...appendages that belong to it. . A man may have an entire house to himself ; and yet not have one complete apartment. with respect to any causes that might interrupt...
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The spelling book superseded, or Exercises on orthography, etymology, and ...

Robert Joseph Sullivan - 1869
...makes us happy,'' imports that virtue, by itself, or unaccompanied with other advantages, is sufficient to do it. Entire, complete. — A thing is entire...appendages that belong to it. A man may have an entire house to himself ; and yet not have one complete apartment. with respect to any causes that might interrupt...
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Moffatt's pupil teachers' course (ed. by T. Page). Candidates, 2nd (-4th) year

Moffatt and Paige - 1879
...founded on the high opinion we entertain of ourselves ; disdain on the mean opinion we have of others. Entire, complete. A thing is entire by wanting none...parts ; complete by wanting none of the appendages which belong to it. " The man has an entire house to himself, but there is not one complete apartment...
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Short essays: original and selected

Short essays - 1885 - 195 páginas
...founded on the high opinion we entertain of ourselves ; disdain on the mean opinion we have of others. Entire, complete. A thing is entire by wanting none...parts ; complete by wanting none of the appendages which belong to it. " The man has an entire house to himself, but there is not one complete apartment...
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The Writer's Handbook, a Guide to the Art of Composition, Embracing a ...

1888 - 555 páginas
...distinguished from each other by their qualities ; they are separated by the distance of time or place. Entire, complete. — A thing is entire by wanting none of its parts ; complete by wanting none of its appendages. A man may be master of an entire house, ' which has not one complete apartment. Equivocal,...
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Composition and Style

Robert D. Blackman - 1908 - 320 páginas
...distinguished from each other by their qualities ; they are separated by the distance of time or place. Entire, complete. — A thing is entire by wanting none of its parts ; complete by wanting none of its appendages. A man may be master of an entire house, which has not one complete apartment. Equivocal,...
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Lectures on Rhetoric

Hugh Blair, Grenville Kleiser - 1911 - 164 páginas
...unaccompanied with other advantages, is sufficient to do it. Entire, complete. A thing is entire, by 45 wanting none of its parts ; complete, by wanting none...appendages that belong to it. A man may have an entire house to himself, and yet not have one complete apartment. Tranquillity, peace, calm. Tranquillity...
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