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" How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. "
Lives of eminent persons; consisting of Galileo, Kepler - Página 8
por Lives - 1833
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The History of Civilisation in Scotland, Volumen4

John Mackintosh - 1896
...that sympathy is the origin and source of moral approbation. "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature...render their happiness necessary to him, though he desires nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it." Thus, sympathy being one of the original...
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Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Volumen34

Charles Dudley Warner - 1896
...is evidently some principle in his nature which interests him in the fortune of others, and renders their happiness necessary to him ; though he derives...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it." The full title of Adam Smith's great work, ordinarily given as simply the 'Wealth of Nations,' is 'An...
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British Moralists, Being Selections from Writers Principally of ..., Volumen1

Sir Lewis Amherst Selby-Bigge - 1897
...OF THE SENSE OF PROPRIETY. CHAPTER I. — OF SYMPATHY. 251 How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature,...of seeing it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others, when we either see it, or are made to conceive...
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Library of the World's Best Literature: A-Z

Charles Dudley Warner, Hamilton Wright Mabie, Lucia Isabella Gilbert Runkle, George H. Warner, Edward Cornelius Towne - 1897
...is evidently some principle in his nature which interests him in the fortune of others, and renders their happiness necessary to him ; though he derives...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it." The full title of Adam Smith's great work, ordinarily given as simply the 'Wealth of Nations,' is 'An...
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Useful Instruction (In Matters Religious, Moral and Other.)

Motilal M. Munshi - 1904
...wisdom has decreed That man of man should ever stand in need. How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature,...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it. « — ADAM SMITH. Nature, when she formed man for society, endowed him with an original desire to...
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Sociology and Social Progress

Thomas Nixon Carver - 1905 - 810 páginas
...do even at the moment of their promulgation. XVI SYMPATHY1 How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature which interest him in the fortunes of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it...
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The Classical Moralists: Selections Illustrating Ethics from Socrates to ...

Benjamin Rand - 1909 - 797 páginas
...SECTION I. OF THE SENSE OF PROPRIETY CHAPTER I. OF SYMPATHY How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature,...of seeing it. Of this kind is pity or compassion, the emotion which we feel for the misery of others, when we either see it, or are made to conceive...
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The Development of Economics, 1750-1900

Oswald Fred Boucke - 1921 - 348 páginas
...opening sentence of his "Theory of the Moral Sentiments" reads: "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it." Thus formulating the problem he proceeds to solve it, the general course of his argument being sufficiently...
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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

Adam Smith - 2008 - 1152 páginas
...exploration of the sentiment of sympathy, which interests a man "in the fortune of others, and renders their happiness necessary to him, though he derives...nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it." Nevertheless Smith believed that the most persistent, the most universal, and therefore the most reliable...
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Individualism and the Social Order: The Social Element in Liberal Thought

Charles Robert McCann, Charles (University of Pittsburgh McCann, USA) - 2004 - 234 páginas
...sustained, offers the following assessment: How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidendy some principles in his nature, which interest him...nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it. (A. Smith 1 790, Part I, Sec. I, Ch. I, p. 9) As with Hume and Ferguson, Smith is quite emphatic in...
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