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government of the Christian Church. In this they were certainly guided by Christ Himself personally and by His Spirit. He Himself spoke of the Church as a tribunal like the synagogue : “If he shall neglect to hear them, tell it unto the church : but if he neglect to hear the church, let bim be unto thee as an beatben man and a publican." Our Lord personally instructed His apostles for the forty days of His resurrection-life in “ the things pertaining to the kingdom of God." Moreover, gifts of organisation are specially referred to as amongst the gifts of the Holy Spirit, “ helps," "goveroments,” being enumerated together with the gifts of healing and of tongues as spiritual gifts.

This view of the identity of the offices of bishop” and “elder" is proved by a simple comparison of passages. In Acts xv. 23 we have a glimpse of the office-bearers in the mother-Church at Jerusalem. Ia tuis passage, where there is sufficient reason in the connection for the omission of any mention of deacons, “elders” are the only officers mentioned besides the apostles. “Bishops and deacons

were the officers of the most ancient Church on the European continent founded by apostles (Phil. i. 1.) In Acts xx. 17 St. Paul sends for “ the elders of the church,” and, when they are come, names them“ bishops," (Acts xx. 28.) King James's translators seem to have iutentionally concealed this from the English reader, by translating the term everywhere else rendered bishop” by the word "overseer.” Similarly, in Titus i. 5, 7, St. Paul, after directing the ordination of "elders," names them bishops," when he proceeds to describe the qualifications necessary.

In further support of the view here taken two valuable testimonies may be cited.

“ The best commentators, ancient and modern," says Dr. Bloomfield, in his well-known edition of the Greek Testament,

“ have with reason affirmed that the terms as yet denoted the same thing. Dean Alford writes : “It is merely laying a trap for misunderstanding to render the word, at that stage of the Church's history, the office of a bishop.' The bishops of the New Testament have officially nothing in common with our bishops."

The simple eldership is, then, the office referred to in this “ faithful saying." Let no member of any of our scripturally organised Churches for a moment give place to the idea that Episcopalians have a more primitive Church order than our own. Quite apart from the question of State connection, we may on scriptural grounds deny the validity of prelacy, and consequently of all acts of ordination performed by prelates. Charity may dictate our recognition of * clergymen" as ministers of one branch of the Church, and we may as a matter of courtesy concede to them the title of "reverend,” given in the usages of society to ministers of religion; but truth compels us to deny that they are properly ordained.

Concerning the office, the pature of which it has now been sought to clear from misconception, it is here said that it is " Both the noun and the adjestive are emphatic. The ministry is a

a good work."

work. Let no one seek the office who desires a life of genteel ease, or even of learned leisure. There is work enough in it for the best energies of the most laborious. The ministry is a good work." The phrase is the same as that used in familiar passages, such as that in wbich the Divine intention is indicated that all the people of God should be “zealous of good works," and the sense of the somewhat ambiguous word “good” is beautiful, noble, excellent, useful.

The saying before us may have been intended to encourage those fitted for the office who, in days of threatened persecution, may have been deterred from it by fear of the prominence which made ministers especially the object of the world's violence. It may be useful also for the encouragement of such as have, in these days, to bear only the world's scorn or perhaps the Church's neglect. The ministry amongst us is in no danger, for the most part, of being too highly estremed. Many of our oxen are muzzled as they tread the corn, and while this is so they cannot be expected to be “ strong to labour." This " saying " is worthy of all acceptation by our deacons and by our Churches. May our consideration of it tend also to the encouragement of some careworn and depressed brethren whom God has put into the ministry!” Let such magnify their office while they minify themselves, and may all engaged in this “ good work” hear at length the Master's “ Well done, good and faithful servant ! "

GRETCHEN AND ANNA.

FOR THE YOUNG.

The great clock had just tolled ings of the previous week, nor the the hour of noon. Upon the quiet stories from the lips of our Lord square in front of the old school- Jesus which he had related. How house, it was bright and cheerful. He, the sinless One, had passed A crowd of gay girls were stream. through the cities and villages of ing from the open door, laughing the Judæan land, leaving, everyand chattering merrily. On the ad- where blessing and peace; how He jacent street corner stood a poorly had healed the sick, comforted the clad girl, gazing idly at them. sorrowful, and taken to His tender "Oh, see yonder is silly Gretchen,” heart, with pitiful love, those who cried one of the girls, and immedi- were despised and forsaken by the ately several of them gathered round world ; and she also remembered the poor child, endeavouring by how, as she had listened, her heart jests and ridicule to excite her had glowed with love towards this anger. Nor was this difficult to do. merciful Saviour, and how she had Gretchen's eyes grew wild and longed for some occasion of imitafierce. She wrung her hands help- ting Him. This occasion had come, lessly, uttering at the same time but Anna was shy, and she felt as some incoherent exclamations, though she could never summon which caused bursts of laughter resolution sufficient to speak to her from the heedless girls. One only companions. Yet, as she hesitated, in the number remained silent. She the thought rose, “ If Jesus was had not forgotten her pastor's teach. walking through these streets as He

government of the Christian Church. In this they were certainly guided by Christ Himself personally and by His Spirit. He Himself spoke of the Church as a tribunal like the synagogue : “If he shall neglect to hear them, tell it unto the church : but if he neglect to hear the church, let bim be unto thee as an heathen man and a publican." Our Lord personally instructed His apostles for the forty days of His resurrection-life in the things pertaining to the kingdom of God.” Moreover, gifts of organisation are specially referred to as amongst the gifts of the Holy Spirit, “ helps,” “goveroments,” being enumerated together with the gifts of healing and of tongues as spiritual gifts.

This view of the identity of the offices of " bishop” and “elder" is proved by a simple comparison of passages. In Acts xv. 23 we have a glimpse of the office-bearers in the mother-Church at Jernsalem. In tuis passage, where there is sufficient reason in the connection for the omission of any mention of deacons, “elders" are the only officers mentioned besides the apostles Bishops and deacons" were the officers of the most ancient Church on the European continent founded by apostles (Phil. i. 1.) In Acts xx. 17 St. Paul sends for the elders of the church,” and, when they are come, names them “bishops," (Acts xx. 28:) King James's translators seem to have iutentionally concealed this from the English reader, by translating the term everywhere else rendered “bishop” by the word “overseer." Similarly, in Titus i. 5, 7, St. Paul, after directing the ordination of “ elders," names them bishops," when he proceeds to describe the qualifications necessary.

In further support of the view here taken two valuable testimonies may be cited. • The best commentators, ancient and modern," says Dr. Bloomfield, in his well-known edition of the Greek Testament, “ have with reason affirmed that the terms as yet denoted the same thing." Dean Alford writes: “It is merely laying a trap for misunderstanding to render the word, at that stage of the Church's history, 'the office of a bishop.' The bishops of the New Testament have officially nothing in common with our bisbops."

The simple eldership is, then, the office referred to in this “ faithful saying." Let no member of any of our scripturally organised Churches for a moment give place to the idea that Episcopalians have a more primitive Church order than our own. Quite apart from the question of State connection, we may on scriptoral grounds deny the validity of prelacy, and consequently of all acts of ordination performed by prelates. Charity may dictate our recognition of * clergymen " as ministers of one branch of the Church, and we may as a matter of courtesy concede to them the title of " reverend,” given in the usages of society to ministers of religion; but truth compels us to deny that they are properly ordained.

Concerning the office, the nature of which it has now been sought to clear from misconception, it is here said that it is “ Both the noun and the adjeotive are emphatic. The ministry is a

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good work."

work. Let no one seek the office who desires a life of genteel ease, or even of learned leisure. There is work enough in it for the best energies of the most laborious. The ministry is “a good work." The phrase is the same as that used in familiar passages, such as that in wbich the Divine intention is indicated that all the people of God should be “ zealous of good works," and the sense of the somewhat ambiguous word “good” is beautiful, noble, excellent, useful.

The saying before us may have been intended to encourage those fitted for the office who, in days of threatened persecution, may have been deterred from it by fear of the prominence which made ministers especially the object of the world's violence. It may be useful also for the encouragement of such as have, in these days, to bear only the world's scorn or perhaps the Church's neglect. The ministry amongst us is in no danger, for the most part, of being too highly estremed. Many of our oxen are muzzled as they tread the corn, and while this is so they cannot be expected to be strong to labour." This “ saying " is worthy of all acceptation by our deacons and by our Churches. May our consideration of it tend also to the encouragement of some careworn and depressed brethren whom God has “put into the ministry !” Let such magnify their office while they minify themselves, and may all engaged in this "good work” hear at length the Master's “ Well done, good and faithful servant!'

GRETCHEN AND ANNA.

FOR THE YOUNG.

The great clock had just tolled ings of the previous week, nor the the hour of noon. Upon the quiet stories from the lips of our Lord square in front of the old school- Jesus which he had related. How house, it was bright and cheerful. He, the sinless One, had passed A crowd of gay girls were stream. through the cities and villages of ing from the open door, laughing the Judæan land, leaving, everyand chattering merrily. On the ad- where blessing and peace; how He jacent street corner stood a poorly had healed the sick, comforted the clad girl, gazing idly at them. sorrowful, and taken to His tender "Oh, see yonder is silly Gretchen,” heart, with pitiful love, those who cried one of the girls, and immedi- were despised and forsaken by the ately several of them gathered round world ; and she also remembered the poor child, endeavouring by how, as she had listened, her heart jests and ridicule to excite her had glowed with love towards this anger. Nor was this difficult to do. merciful Saviour, and how she had Gretchen's eyes grew wild and longed for some occasion of imitafierce. She wrung her hands help- ting Him. This occasion had come, lessly, uttering at the same time but Anna was shy, and she felt as some incoherent exclamations, though she could never summon which caused bursts of laughter resolution sufficient to speak to her from the heedless girls. One only companions. Yet, as she hesitated, in the number remained silent. She the thought rose, If Jesus was had not forgotten her pastor's teach- walking through these streets as He

did through the streets of Jerusa- lazy to work,” was the rough greetlem, I know He would do some- ing, when she heard the girls enter thing for Gretchen." This thought the room. She did not observe gave her courage, and with quick Anna, however, until she said, “I steps she went to Gretchen's side. came home with Gretchen to-day, Taking her hand she said gently, because some girls were teasing " Come with me, Gretchen." The her. You should not allow her to child turned and stared at her in be on the street so much." Mrs. surprise. It was so seldom a kind. Payne turned in surprise, and when ly word fell on her ear that she she saw the well-dressed girl, she could scarcely comprehend it. Yet said, in an apologetic tone, “Really, she allowed Anna to lead her away. I should be glad to keep her off the Nor were the other girls less sur- street, but how can I? I am always prised, and more then one felt their busy myself, and it vexes me to see faces glow with shame at the quiet her idling around.” rebuke.

“Well, if you have no objection, And would my little readers care I will ask my mother's permission to know more of Gretchen's story? to take Gretchen home with me She had been an orphan from baby- some time.” hood. She was partially deaf, and “I'm quite willing, but I fancy her enunciation was very bad. All you will soon have enough of her." her movements were uncouth, and With a kind good-bye, but no her face had such a dull, stupid ex- reply to this last remark, Anna hurpression as to make it seem almost ried home. She related the occur. idiotic. Yet deep down in her rence to her mother, and received heart, unknown to herself, lay hid- her cordial consent to befriend the den away a keen desire to have helpless child. When school was her place in the world to fill and over the same afternoon, she again a longing for love and sympa- visited the dull old house, and was thy. These emotions would per- greatly pleased to observe the gleam haps never have found expression, of pleasure which flitted across the but for Anna's kindness. As the heavy face when Gretchen pertwo girls went their way together, ceived her. Through the long sumneither of them could foresee that in mer afternoon, Anna showed Gretthis hour a seed of love had been chen her old picture Bible, and sown which should in after time Mrs. Turner told them stories of bring forth rich fruit. Only one the blessed One, who now and Eye saw it and rejoiced over it, ad- for ever loves little children; how ding thereto His blessing—that was He, once despised and forsaken, bore the All-seeing eye of Him who said, with patience all scorn and ill treat“ What ye have done unto the ment; and how we must follow in least of these ye have also done His holy footsteps, if we would enunto me.” The girls were not long ter into His heavenly kingdom. in reaching the street where Gret. There was much in all this which chen lived. They climbed the Gretchen could not understand, but steep stairs of a dark rear house one thing was manifest. She, poor where Gretchen had a home with and ignorant though she was,

had an aunt who gained a scanty liveli- one Friend who loved her and hood by washing and cleaning. would always care for her. She was a sharp, brisk woman, On her return home, she longed whose life had been one long, hard to express to her aunt some of the struggle with poverty and care. new feelings stirring her heart, but

“ So, you always turn up when she was too little accustomed to it's time to eat, though you are too speech, and her emotion was too

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