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HENRY THE SECOND.

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This Prince, though of a very easy and accommodating disposition, knew when it was proper to give a refusal. His favourite sister, married to the Duke of Savoy, was very earnest with him to render to her husband the strong fortresses of Pignerol, Tarillon, and Perouse, which

may be looked upon as the keys of France toward Italy. He told the Ambassadors from Savoy, who intimated his sister's desire to him, “ I am extremely fond “ of my sister, but I would much sooner give her my two eyes out of my head than these three fortresses.

Henry was killed at a tournament; and when Catherine of Medicis sent to his mistress, Diana de Poitiers, for

the crown jewels, with which he had presented her, she · returned them, and told the messenger, “ Alas! I have now no master; “ and I wish my enemies to know, that

though the Prince is dead, I am not afraid of them; " and if I have the misfortune to survive my Sovereign

any time, my heart will be too much affected with

grief at losing him, to feel in the least degree the “ uneasiness and the indignities which they will endea“ vour to put upon me.”

MARESCHAL STROZZI.

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His son coming one day to wish him good morning, he said to him, “ Young man, what have you been doing this morning ?”- - Sir," replied his son, “ I have been to the manege, I have played at tennis, and I have breakfasted.” « Blockhead!” said the Marshal, “ · satisfy the wants of the body before those of the soul. Pray let that never happen again. Before you do any thing else, feed your mind with the perusal of some good book, or pursue some study or other, and then do afterwards with your body what you please.”

According to Brotier, Strozzi was continually reading the history, of some of the military expeditions of antiquity; and said, that they were of equal use to him with the practice and exercise of the military art.

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REVIEW OF BOOKS.

PROBATQUE CULPATQUE.

Collections for the History of the Town and Soke of Grant

ham; containing authentic Memoirs of Sir Isaac Neroton, now first published, from the original MSS. in the Possession of the Earl of Portsmouth. By Edmund

Turnor, F.R.S. F.A.S. 410. 11. 8s. Miller.

As a topographical work this volume has many claims to praise, the ingenious author having availed himself of every authority, written, oral, and traditionary, to make it in all respects complete ; but the book is chiefly valuable on account of the authentic particulars it records of the life of our illustrious countryman, Sir Isaac Newton, of whose private history and conduct so little has hitherto been known. The valuable MSS. which have afforded these memoranda came into the possession of the Eart of Portsmouth from his lordship’s grandmother, Catherine Viscountess Lymington, daughter and sole heiress of John Conduitt, Esq. by Catherine Barton, niece of Sir Isaac Newton. This lady, educated at Sir Isaac's expense, and who lived with him near twenty years, before and after her marriage with Mr. Conduitt, was celebrated for her wit and beauty; and was much noticed for her engaging manners by the Earl of Halifax, who made her a considerable bequest at his death.

It is curious to observe from what trifling accidents the most important occurrences sometimes arise ; but for the following rather ludicrous circumstance, it is not improbable that Newton might have remained a dunce all his life, and the world have lost its most enlightened philosopher.

6. Sir Isaac used to relate that he was very negligent at school, and very low in it, till the boy above him

gave him a kick in the belly, which put him to a great deal of pain. Not content with having thrashed his adversary, Sir Isaac could not rest till he had got before him in the school, and from that time he continued rising till he was the head-boy."

As every thing connected with the name of this wor. HENRY THE SECOND. This Prince, though of a very easy and accommodating disposition, knew when it was proper to give a refusal. His favourite sister, married to the Duke of Savoy, was very earnest with him to render to her husband the strong fortresses of Pignerol, Tarillon, and Perouse, which

may

be looked upon as the keys of France toward Italy. He told the Ambassadors from Savoy, who intimated his sister's desire to him, “ I am extremely fond “ of my sister, but I would much sooner give her my “ two eyes out of my head than these three fortresses.”

Henry was killed at a tournament; and when Catherine of Medicis sent to his mistress, Diana de Poitiers, for the crown jewels, with which he had presented her, she returned them, and told the messenger, “ Alas ! I have now no master; “ and I wish my enemies to know, that

though the Prince is dead, I am not afraid of them; 66 and if I have the misfortune to survive my Sovereign

any time, my heart will be too much affected with *“ grief at losing him, to feel in the least degree the “ uneasiness and the indignities which they will endea“ vour to put upon me.”

never

MARESCHAL STROZZI. His son coming one day to wish him good morning, he said to him, “ Young man, what have you been doing this morning?”Sir,replied his son, “ I have been to the manege, I have played at tennis, and I have breakfasted.” « Blockhead!” said the Marshal, “ · satisfy the wants of the body before those of the soul. Pray let that never happen again. Before you do any thing else, feed your mind with the perusal of some good book, or pursue some study or other, and then do afterwards with your body what you please.”

According to Brotier, Strozzi was continually reading the history of some of the military expeditions of antiquity; and said, that they were of equal use to him with the practice and exercise of the military art,

REVIEW OF BOOKS.

PROBATQUE CULPATQUE.

Collections for the History of the Town and Soke of Grant

ham; containing authentic Memoirs of Sir Isaac Nero. ton, now first published, from the original MSS. in the Possession of the Earl of Portsmouth. By Edmund

Turnor, F.R.S. F.A.S. .410. 11. 8s. Miller.

As a topographical work this volume has many claims to praise, the ingenious author having availed hiinself of every authority, written, oral, and traditionary, to make it in all respects complete ; but the book is chiefly valuable on account of the authentic particulars it records of the life of our illustrious countryman, Sir Isaac Newton, of whose private history and conduct so little has hitherto been known. The valuable MSS. which have afforded these memoranda came into the possession of the Eart of Portsmouth from his lordship’s grandmother, Cathea rine Viscountess Lymington, daughter and sole heiress of John Conduitt, Esq. by Catherine Barton, niece of Sir Isaac Newton. This lady, educated at Sir Isaac's expense, and who lived with him near twenty years, before and after her marriage with Mr. Conduitt, was celebrated for her wit and beauty; and was much noticed for her engaging manners by the Earl of Halifax, who made her a considerable bequest at his death.

It is curious to observe from what trifling accidents the most important occurrences sometimes arise ; but for the following rather ludicrous circumstance, it is not improbable that Newton might have remained a dunce all his life, and the world have lost its most enlightened philosopher.

« Sir Isaac used to relate that he was very negligent at school, and very low in it, till the boy above him gave him a kick in the belly, which put him to a great deal of pain. Not content with having thrashed his adversary, Sir Isaac could not rest till he had got before him in the school, and from that time he continued rising till he was the head-boy.”

As every thing connected with the name of this won.

derful man must be interesting, we offer no apology to our readers for extracting the following information :

“ Sir Isaac lived in London ever since the year 1696, when he was made Warden of the Mint; nobody ever lived with him but my wife, who was with bim near twenty yeurs, before and after her marriage. He always lived in a very handsome generous manner, though without ostentation or vanity; always hospitable, and, upon proper occasions, gave splendid entertainments. He was generous and charitable without bounds; he used to say, that they who gave away nothing till they died, never gave, which, perhaps, was one reason why he did not make a will. I believe no man of his circumstances ever gave away so much during his lifetime in alms, in encouraging ingenuity and learning, and to his relations, nor upon all occasions shewed a greater contempt of his own money, or a more scrupulous frugality of that which belonged to the public, or to any society he was entrusted for, He refused pensions and additional employments that were offered him, and was highly honoured and respected in all reigns, and under all administrations, even by those he opposed; for in every station he shewed an inflexible attachment to the cause of liberty, and our present happy establishment.

“. Notwithstanding the extraordinary honours that were paid him, he had so humble an opinion of him. self, that he had no relish of the applause which was so deservedly paid him; and he was so little vain and desirous of glory from any of his works, that he, as it is well known, would have let others run away with the glory of those inventions, which have done so much honour to human nature, if his friends and countrymen had not been more jealous than he of his and their glory. He was exceedingly courteous and affable, even to the lowest, and never despised any man for want of capacity, but always expressed freely his resentment against any immorality or impiety. He not only shewed a great and constant regard to religion in general, as well by an exemplary course of life as in all his writings, but was also a firm believer of revealed religion, which appears by the many papers he has left on that subject; but his notion of the Christian religion was not founded on a narrow bottom, nor his charity and morality so scanty, as to shew a coldness to those who thought otherwise than he did, in matters indifferent; much less to

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