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CONTENTS.

PREFACE
CYMBELINE
MACBETH
JULIUS CÆSAR
OTHELLO
TIMON OF ATHENS
CORIOLANUS
TROILUS AND CRESSIDA
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA
HAMLET
THE TEMPEST
THE MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM
ROMEO AND JULIET
LEAR
RICHARD II.
HENRY IV. Part I. AND II.
HENRY V.
HENRY VI. IN THREE PARTS
RICHARD III.
HENRY VIII.
KING JOHN
TWELFTH NIGHT; OR, WHAT YOU WILL
THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE
THE WINTER'S TALE
ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL
LOVE'S LABOUR LOST
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING
AS YOU LIKE IT
• THE TAMING OF THE SHREW
MEASURE FOR MEASURE
THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR
THE COMEDY OF ERRORS
DOUBTFUL PLAYS OF SHAKESPEAR
POEMS AND SONNETS

Page vii

1 15 33 42 61 69 83 95 103 115 126 135 153

178 - 188

203 215 226 237 243 255 265 269 278 287 293 298 305 312 320 327 331 335 346

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Page
21, l. 13—for “ and who" read who.”
66, l. 23—for “ manners” read marrows."
92, l. 12--for “ what was coming" read “ what is coming."
208, i. 5-for “ himself” read “ him."

PREFACE.

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It is observed by Mr. Pope, that “ If ever any author deserved the name of an original, it was Shakespear. Homer himself drew not his art so immediately from the fountains of nature; it proceeded through Ægyptian strainers and channels, and came to him not without some tincture of the learning, or some cast of the models, of those before him. The poetry of Shakespear was inspiration indeed: he is not so much an imitator, aş an instrument of nature; and it is not so just to say that he speaks from her, as that she speaks through him.

“ His characters are so much nature herself, that it is a sort of injury to call them by so distant a name as copies of her. Those of other poets have a constant resemblance, which shews that they received them from one another, and were but multipliers of the same image : each

picture, like a mock-rainbow, is but the reflec-' tion of a reflection. But every single character in Shakespear, is as much an individual, as those in life itself; it is as impossible to find any two alike; and such, as from their relation or affinity in any respect appear most to be twins, will, upon comparison, be found remarkably distinct. To this life and variety of character, we must add the wonderful preservation of it; which is such throughout his plays, that had all the speeches been printed without the very names of the persons, I believe one might have applied them with certainty to every speaker.”

The object of the volume here offered to the public, is to illustrate these remarks in a more particular manner by a reference to each play. A gentleman of the name of Mason, the author of a Treatise on Ornamental Gardening, (not Mason the poet) began a work of a similar kind about forty years ago, but he only lived to finish a parallel between the characters of Macbeth and Richard III. which is an exceedingly ingenious piece of analytical criticism. Richardson's Essays include but a few of Shakespear's principal characters. The only work which seemed to supersede the necessity of an attempt like the present was Schlegel's very admirable Lectures on the Drama, which give by far the best account of the plays of Shakespear that has hitherto appeared.

The only

circumstances in which it was thought not impossible to improve on the manner in which the German critic has executed this part of his design, were in avoiding an appearance of mysticism in his style, not very attractive to the English reader, and in bringing illustrations from particular passages of the plays themselves, of which Schlegel's work, from the extensiveness of his plan, did not admit. We will at the same time confess, that some little jealousy of the character of the national understanding was not without its share in producing the following undertaking, for “ we were piqued” that it should be reserved for a foreign critic to give

reasons for the faith which we English have jo Shakespear.” Certainly, no writer among ourselves has shewn either the same enthusiastic admiration of his genius, or the same philosophical acuteness in pointing out his characteristic excellences. As we have pretty well exhausted all we had to say upon this subject in the body of the work, we shall here transcribe Schlegel's general account of Shakespear, which is in the following words:

“ Never, perhaps, was there so comprehensive a talent for the delineation of character as Shakespear's. It not only grasps the diversities of rank, sex, and age, down to the dawnings of infancy; not only do the king and the beggar,

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