Imágenes de páginas
PDF

CCCLIX, CCCLX Pages 324, 325—'Give me my scallop-shell of quiet.' 'Even such is Time, that takes in trust.' Of each of these poems it is asserted, probably upon inference, that Raleigh wrote them in the Tower on the night before his death. But, if Raleigh neither wrote them then nor at any time, that they should have been attributed to him as appropriate is evidence in favour of a character that has been judged so variously.

INDEX OF FIRST LINES

PAGE

A Rose as fair as ever saw the North . Browne 112
A sweet disorder in her dress . Herrick 132
Absence, hear thou my protestation . Donne 204
Adieu, farewell earth’s bliss. . . Nashe 249
Ah, were she pitiful as she is fair .

Greene 170
Ah, what is Love! It is a pretty thing. Greene 51
Alas ! my love, you do me wrong . Anon. 263
All I care . . . .

Anon. 279
All the flowers of the Spring . . . Webster 284
All ye that lovely lovers be. .

Peele 39
And wilt thou leave me thus? .

Wyat 228
And yet I cannot reprehend the flight. Daniel 175
Arise, my Thoughts, and mount you

with the sun ! . . . . Anon. 176
Art thou gone in haste . . Wm. Rowley 73
Art thou poor, yet hast thou golden

slumbers ? . . . . . Dekker 48
As careful merchants do expecting stand Browne 210
As I in hoary winter's night . . . Southwell 296
As it fell upon a day . . . . Barnefield 105
As virtuous men pass mildly away . Donne 208
As ye came from the holy hand . . Raleigh 187
Ask me no more where Jove bestows Carew 128
Ask me why I send you here. Carew or Herrick 148
At her fair hands how have I grace en-
treated . . . . . . Davison 190

365

Away delights ! go seek some other

dwelling . . . . . J. Fletcher

227

Beauty clear and fair . . . . J. Fletcher 125
Beauty sat bathing by a spring . . Munday 69
Beauty, sweet Love is like the morning
dew . . . . .

Daniel 20
Being your slave, what should I do but

tend . . . . . Shakespeare 206
Bid me to live, and I will live . . Herrick 197
Blow, blow, thou winter wind . Shakespeare 43
Born was I to be old . . . . Herrick 256

Call for the robin-redbreast and the wren Webster 282
Calling to mind, my eyes went long about Raleigh 186
Can a maid that is well bred . . . Anon. 183
Can I not come to Thee, my God, for

these . . . . . . Herrick 312
Care-charmer Sleep, son of the sable
Night . .

Daniel 158
Care-charming Sleep, thou easer of all

woes . . . . . . Fletcher 158
Charm me asleep and melt me so . . Herrick 162
Cherry-ripe, ripe, ripe, I cry . . Herrick 129
Clear had the day been from the dawn . Drayton 113
Cold 's the wind, and wet is the rain . Dekker 257
Come away, come away, death . Shakespeare 173
Come, bring with a noise . . . Herrick 305
Come hither, shepherd's swain ! . Earl of Oxford 81
Come little babe, come silly soul. , Breton 219
Come live with me and be my love . Marlowe 40
Come, my Celia, let us prove . . Jonson 18
Come, Sleep, O Sleep ! the certain knot

of peace . . . . . Sidney 157
Come, thou monarch of the vine. Shakespeare 255

[merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Come thou, who art the wine and wit Herrick 279
Come unto these yellow sands . Shakespeare 37
Come, worthy Greek ! Ulysses come . Daniel 92
Come, you pretty false-eyed wanton · Campion 89
Corpse, clad with carefulness . . Howell 273
Corydon, arise, my Corydon ! .
Crabbed Age and Youth . . Shakespeare 17
Cupid and my Campaspe play'd . . Lyly 87
Dear, if you change, I'll never choose

again . . . . . . Anon. 194
Dew sat on Julia's hair . . . . Herrick II
Diaphenia like the daffadowndilly . . Constable 55
Did not the heavenly rhetoric of thine
....:

Shakespeare 149
Drink to me only with thine eyes . . Jonson 138
Droop, droop no more, or hang the head Herrick 152
Drop, drop, slow tears . . Phineas Fletcher 322

E'en like two little bank-dividing brooks
Even such is Time, that takes in trust.

Quarles 211
Raleigh 326

Fain would I change that note . . Anon. 141
Fain would I have a pretty thing.

Anon. 150
Fair and fair, and twice so fair .

Peele 67
Fair daffodils, we weep to see . Herrick 109
Fair is my Love, and cruel as she is fair Daniel 168
Fair pledges of a fruitful tree

Herrick 110
Fair summer droops, droop men and

beasts therefore . . • Nashe 249
Farewell ! thou art too dear for my

possessing . . . . Shakespeare 229
Fear no more the heat o' the sun. Shakespeare 237
Fine knacks for ladies! cheap, choice,

brave, and new . . . . Anon. 199
Fire that must flame is with apt fuel fed Campion 170

First shall the heavens want starry light Lodge 194
Follow a shadow, it still flies you . . Jonson 179
Follow thy fair sun, unhappy shadow Campion 178
Follow your saint, follow with accents

sweet . . . . . . Campion 177
For her gait, if she be walking . . Browne 133
Forget not yet the tried intent . . Wyat 189
Fresh Spring, the herald of Love's mighty

king . . . . . . Spenser 2
From you have I been absent in the

Spring . . . . . Shakespeare 202
Full fathom five thy father lies . Shakespeare 281
Full many a glorious morning have I

seen . . . . . Shakespeare 107

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may. . Herrick 15
Get up, get up for shame! The bloom-
ing morn

Herrick 7
Give me my scallop-shell of quiet . . Raleigh 325
Give pardon, blessèd soul, to my loud

cries . . . . . . Constable 292
Give place, you ladies, and begone! John Heywood 120
Glide soft, ye silver floods . . Browne 240
Go, pretty child, and bear this flower. Herrick 302
God Lyaeus, ever young . . . Fletcher 256
Good-morrow to the day so fair . . Herrick 223
Good Muse, rock me asleep. . . Breton 160

Happy were he could finish forth his fate Essex 273
Happy ye leaves whenas those lily hands Spenser 152
Harden now thy tired heart with more

than flinty rage . . . . Campion 226
Hark, all you ladies that do sleep. Campion 38
Hark, hark! the lark at heaven's gate

sings . . . . . Shakespeare I

« AnteriorContinuar »