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pounds; to the poor of St. Andrew's in Holborn, in respect of my long abode in Gray's-Inn, thirty pounds; to the poor of the Abbey church parish in St. Albans, twenty pounds; to the poor of St. Peter's there, twenty pounds; to the poor of St. Stephen's there, twenty pounds; to the poor of Redborn twenty pounds; to the poor of Hemstead, where I heard sermons and prayers

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comfort in the time of the former great plague, twenty pounds; to the poor of Twickenham, where I lived some time at Twickenham park, twenty pounds. I intreat Mr. Shute of Lombard-street to preach my funeral sermon, and to him in that respect I give twenty pounds; or if he cannot be had, Mr. Peterson my late chaplain, or his brother.

Devises and legacies to my wife: I give, grant and confirm to my loving wife by this my last will, whatsoever hath been assured to her, or mentioned or intended to be assured to her by any former deed, be it either my lands in Hertfordshire, or the farm of the seal, or the gift of goods in accomplishment of my covenants of marriage; and I give her also the ordinary stuff at Gurhambury, as wainscot tables, stools, berlding, and the like; (always reserving and excepting the rich hangings with their covers, the table carpets, and the long cushions, and all other stuff which was or

is used in the long gallery ; and also a rich chair,' which was' my niece Cæsar's gift, and also the armour, and also all tables of marble and towch.) I give also to my wife my four coach geldings and my best caroache, and her own coach mares and caroache: I give also and grant to my wife the one half of the rent which was reserved upon Reaed's lease for her life; which rent although I intended to her merely for her better maintenance while she lived at her own charge and not to continue after my death, yet because she has begun to receive it, I am content to continue it to her; and I conceive by this advancement, which first and last I have left her, besides her own inheritance, I have made her of competent abilities to maintain the estate of a viscountess, and given sufficient tokens of my love and liberality towards her; for I do reckon (and that with the least) that Gorhambury and my lands in Hertfordshire, will be worth unto her seven hundred pounds per Annum, besides Woodfells and the leases of the houses, whereof five hundred pounds per Annum only I was tied unto by cove: nants upon marriage: so' as the two hundred pounds and better was mere benevolence; the six hundred pounds per Annum upon the farm of the writs, was likewise mere benevolence; her own inheritance also, with that she purchased with part of her portion, is two hundred pounds per Annum

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and better, besides the wealth she hath in jewels, plate or otherwise, wherein I was never straight. handed. All which I here set down, not because I think it too much, but because others may not think it less than it is.

Legacies to my friends: I give unto the right honourable my worthy friend the marquis Fiat, late lord ambassador of France, my books of orisons or psalms curiously rhymed: I give unto the right honourable my noble friend Edward earl of Dorset, my ring, with the crushed diamond, which the king that now is gave me when he was prince: I give unto my right honourable friend the lord Cavendish, my casting bottle of gold: I give to my

brother Constable all my books, and one hundred pounds to be presented to him in gold: I give to my sister Constable some jewels, to be bought for her of the value of fifty pounds: I give to Nall her daughter some jewels, to be bought for her of the value of forty pounds: I give to my lady Cooke some jewels, to be bought for her of the value of fifty pounds : And to her daughter Anne Cooke, to buy her a jewel, forty pounds: And to her son Charles, some little jewel to the value of thirty pounds. I will also that my executors sell my chambers in Grays-Inn, which (now the lease is full) I conceive may yield some three hundred pounds; one hundred pounds for the ground story,

and two hundred pounds for the third and fourth stories; which money, or whatsoever it be, I desire my executors to bestow for some little present relief upon twenty five poor scholars in both universities, fifteen in Cambridge and ten in Oxonford. I give to Mr. Thomas Meautis, some jewel to be bought for him of the value of fifty pounds, and my footcloth horse: I give to my ancient good friend sir Toby Matthews, some ring to be bought for him of the value of fifty pounds: I give to my very good friend sir Christopher Darcy, some ring to be bought for him of the value of thirty pounds: I give to Mr. Henry Percy one hundred pounds : I give to Mr. Henry Goodricke forty pounds: I give to my God-son Francis Lowe son of Humphrey Lowe, one hundred and fifty pounds: I give

God-son Francis Hatcher son of Mr.William Hatcher, one hundred pounds: I give to my Godson Francis Fleetwood son of Henry Fleetwood Esq; fifty pounds: I give to my God-son Philips son of auditor Philips, twenty pounds : I give to every of my executors a piece of plate of thirty pounds value.

Legacies to my servants now, or late servants : I give to my servant Robert Halpeny four hundred pounds, and the one half of my provisions of hay, firewood and timber, which shall remain at the time of my decease: I give to my servant Stephen

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Paise three hundred and fifty pounds, and my bed with the appurtenances, bed linen and apparel linen as shirts, pillowbiers, sheets, caps, handkerchiefs, &c. I give to my servant Wood three hundred and thirty pounds, with all my apparel, as doublets, hose, and to his wife ten pounds : give to my late servant Francis Edney two hundred pounds, and my rich gown: I give to my ancient servant Throughton one hundred pounds: I give to my chaplain Dr. Rawleigh one hundred pounds: I give to my ancient servant Welles one hundred pounds : I give to my ancient servant Fletcher one hundred pounds, and to his brother ten pounds; and if my servant Fletcher be dead, then the whole to his brother: I give to my wife's late waiting gentlewoman Mrs. Wagstaffe, one hundred pounds: I give to Morrice Davis one hundred pounds: I give to old John Bayes one hundred pounds: I give to my ancient servant Woder threescore and ten pounds: I give to my ancient servant Guilman threescore pounds: I give to my ancient servant Faldo forty pounds: I give to London my coachman forty pounds: I give to Harsnepp my groom forty pounds : I give to Abraham my footman forty pounds: I give Smith my bayliff and his wife forty pounds: I give to my ancient servant Bowes thirty pounds: I give to my servant Atkins thirty pounds: I give to old Tho

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