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Villenage or tenure by copy of court-roll...... 257 Legacies are to be paid before debts by shop
Court baron, with the use of it...

257

books, bills unsealed, or contracts by word 266

What attainders shall give the escheat to the An executor may pay which legacy he will first.

lord.....

257

Or if the executors do want, they may sell

Prayer of clergy.

257

any legacy to pay debts.....

266

He that standeth mute forfeiteth no lands, ex-

When a will is made, and no executor named,

cept for treason....

258

administration is to be committed cum tes-

He that killeth himself forfeiteth but his

tamento annexo.

266

chattels....

258

Flying for felony a forfeiture of goods........ 258 ARGUMENTS IN LAW IN CEITAIN GREAT AND

Lands entailed, escheat to the king for treason 258

DIFFICULT Cases...

267

A person attainted may purchase, but it shall The Case of Impeachment of Waste.

268

be to the king's use. ......

253 The Argument in Low's Case of Tenures.... 276

Property of lands by conveyance is first distri-

The Case of Revocation of Uses..

2.90

buted into estates, for years, for life, in tail,

The Jurisdiction of the Marches..

285

and fee simple. .

259

THE LEARNED READING OF MR. FRANCIS BA-

Lease for years go to the executors, and not to

the heirs...

CON, UPON THE STATUTE OF Uses, being

259

his double reading to the Honourable So-

Leases, by what means they are forfeitable.... 259

ciety of Gray's Inn, 42 Eliz..

295

What livery of seisin is, and how it is requisite

to every estate for life..

259 THE OFFICE OF CONSTABLES, ORIGINAL AND

Of the new device, called a perpetuity, which

Use or COURT'S LEET, SHERIFF'S TURN,

is an entail with an addition.....

260

&c., with the Answers to the Questions

The inconveniences of these perpetuities.. 260

propounded by Sir Alexander Hay, Knt.,

The last and greatest estate in land is fee

touching the Office of Constables.

315

simple.......

260

AN ACCOUNT OF THE LATELY ERECTED SER-

The difference between a remainder and a

reversion..

260

VICE, CALLED THE OFFICE OF COMPOSI-

What a fine is.

319

261

TIONS FOR ALIENATIONS......

What recoveries are..

261

What a use is......

262

THE GREAT INSTAURATION OF LORD

A conveyance to stand seised to a use.

262

BACON.

Of the continuance of land by will.

262

329

Property in goods: 1. By gift. 2. By sale.

Editor's Preface.

3. By stealing. 4. By waving. 5. By

Introduction

332

333

straying. 6. By shipwreck.

Dedication.

17. By

forfeiture.

Preface ...

334

8. By executorship....... 264

338

Distribution of the Work....

By letters of administration.....

265

Where the intestate had bona notabilia in

divers dioceses, then the archbishop of

SECOND PART OF THE GREAT INSTAURATION.

that province where he died is to commit

THE NOVUM ORGANUM; OR, FIVE SUGGES-

administration

265

INTERPRETATION

An executor

may

refuse the executorship before

NATURE..

3.13

the bishop, if he have not intermeddled

Preface.....

343

with the goods....

265

Summary of the Second Part, digested in

An executor ought to pay, 1. Judgments. 2.

Aphorisms...

345

Stat. Recog. 3. Debts by bonds and bills

Aphorisms on the Interpretation of Nature and

sealed. 4. Rent unpaid. 5. Servants'

the Empire of Man.....

315

wages.
6. Head workmen. 7. Shop

The Second Book of Aphorisms on the Inter-

book, and contracts by word..

265

pretation of Nature, or the Reign of Man 37!

Debts due in equal degree of record, the execu-

tor may pay which of them he pleases A PREPARATION FOR A NATURAL AND EXPE-

before suit be commenced..

266

RIMENTAL HISTORY

426

But it is otherwise with administrators.

266 A Description of such a Natural and Experi-

Property by legacy....

266

mental History as shall be sufficient and

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LORD BACON'S

BACON'S WORKS.

LETTERS FROM THE CABALA.

CONCERNING THE SOLICITOR'S PLACE.

SIR FRANCIS BACON TO THE LORD TREASURER, (his place with great sufficiency. But those anıl

the like things are as her majesty shall be made AFTER the remembrance of my humble duty, capable of them; wherein, knowing what authorthough I know, by late experience, how mindful ity your lordship’s commendations have with her your lordship vouchsafeth to be of me and my majesty, I conclude with myself, that the subpoor fortune, and since it pleased your lordship, stance of strength which I may receivė, will be during my indisposition, and when her majesty from your lordship. It is true, my life hath been came to visit your lordship, to make mention of so private, as I have had no means to do your lordme for my employment and preferment; yet being ship service; but yet, as your lordship knoweth, now in the country, I do presume that your lord- I have made offer of such as I could yield; for, ship, who of yourself had an honourable care of as God hath given me a mind to love the public, the matter, will not think it a trouble to be solicited so, incidently, I have ever had your lordship in therein. My hope is this, that whereas your lord- singular admiration; whose happy ability her ship told me her majesty was somewhat gravelled majesty hath so long used, to her great honour upon the offence she took at my speech in parlia- and yours. Besides, that amendment of state or ment; your lordship's favourable endeavour, who countenance, which I have received, hath been hath assured me that for your own part you con- from your lordship. And, therefore, if your lordstrue that I spake to the best, will be as a good ship shall stand a good friend to your poor ally, tide to remove her from that shelve. And it is you shall but 6 tueri opus” which you have benot unknown to your good lordship, that I was gun. And your lordship shall bestow your benefit the first of the ordinary sort of the Lower House upon one that hath more sense of obligation than that spake for the subsidy: and that which I after of self-love. Thus humbly desiring pardon of so spake in difference, was but in circumstance of long a letter, I wish your lordship all happiness. time, which methinks was no great matter, since Your lordship’s in all humbleness to be comthere is variety allowed in counsel, as a discord manded. in music, to make it more perfect.

FR. Bacon. But I may justly doubt, her majesty's impres- June 6, 1595. sion upon this particular, as her conceit otherwise of my insufficiency and unworthiness, which, SIR FRANCIS BACON TO THE LORD TREASURER though I acknowledge to be great, yet it will be the less, because I purpose not to divide myself My Lord, between her majesty and the causes of other men,

With as much confidence as mine own honest as others have done, but to attend her business and faithful devotion unto your service, and your only: hoping that a whole man meanly able, may honourable correspondence unto me and my poor do as well as half a man better able. And if her estate can breed in a man, do I commend myself majesty thinketh that she shall make an adven- unto your lordship. I wax now somewhat ancient; ture in using one that is rather a man of study one-and-thirty years is a great deal of sand in the than of practice and experience, surely I may re-hour-glass. My health, I thank God, I find con. member to have heard that my father, an example, firmed; and I do not fear that action shall impair I confess, rather ready than like, was made solici. it: because I account my ordinary course of study tor of the augmentation, a court of much business, and meditation to be more painful than most parts when he had never practised, and was but twenty- of action are. I ever bear a mind, in some middle seven years old; and Mr. Brograve was now in place that I could discharge, to serve her majesty; my time called attorney of the duchy, when he had not as a man born under Sol, that loveth honour; practised little or nothing, and yet hath discharged I nor under Jupiter, that loveth business, for the Vol. III.-I

А.

BURGIILEY.

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