Art of Angling

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Procter, 1826 - 154 páginas
 

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Página 85 - There throw, nice judging, the delusive fly ; And as you lead it round in artful curve, With eye attentive mark the springing game...
Página 94 - To frame the little animal, provide All the gay hues that wait on female pride: Let Nature guide thee; sometimes golden wire The shining bellies of the fly require: The peacock's plumes thy tackle must not fail, Nor the dear purchase of the sable's tail. Each gaudy bird some slender tribute brings, And lends the growing insect proper wings : Silks of all colours must their aid impart, And every fur promote the fisher's art.
Página 44 - A rod twelve feet long and a ring of wire, A winder and barrel, will help thy desire In killing a Pike : but the forked stick, With a slit and a bladder, — and that other fine trick, Which our artists call snap, with a goose or a duck, — Will kill two for one, if you have any luck ; The gentry of Shropshire do merrily smile, To see a goose and a belt the fish to beguile. When a Pike suns himself, and a-frogging doth go, The two-inched hook is better, I know, Than the ord'nary snaring. But still...
Página 85 - With eye attentive mark the springing game. Straight as above the surface of the flood They wanton rise, or urg'd by hunger leap, Then fix, with gentle twitch, the barbed hook : Some lightly tossing to the grassy bank, And to the shelving shore slow-dragging some, With various hand proportion'd to their force.
Página 85 - Of pendent trees, the monarch of the brook. Behoves you then to ply your finest art. Long time he, following cautious, scans the fly ; And oft attempts to seize it, but as oft The dimpled water speaks his jealous fear. At last, while haply o'er the shaded sun Passes a cloud, he desperate takes the death. With sullen plunge. At once he darts along. Deep struck, and runs out all the lengthened line ; Then seeks the farthest ooze, the sheltering weed.
Página 114 - Till we fish entangle. We have gentles in a horn, We have paste and worms too ; We can watch both night and morn, Suffer rain and storms too; None do here Use to swear ; Oaths do fray Fish away ; We sit still, And watch our quill ; Fishers must not wrangle. If the sun's excessive heat Make our bodies swelter, To an osier hedge we get For a friendly shelter...
Página 119 - The worm that draws a long immoderate size, The trout abhors, and the rank morsel flies ; And, if too small, the naked fraud's in sight, And fear forbids, while hunger does invite. Those baits will best reward the fisher's pains, Whose...
Página 142 - ... to the House of Correction, there to be kept to hard labour for any time not exceeding three calendar months...
Página 20 - As though within her bounds they meant her to inclose ; Here, when the labouring fish does at the foot arrive, And finds that by his strength he does but vainly strive ; His tail takes in his mouth, and bending like a bow That's to full compass...
Página 93 - Now when the first foul torrent of the brooks, Swell'd with the vernal rains, is ebbd away, And, whitening, down their mossy-tinctured stream Descends the billowy foam ; now is the time, While yet the dark-brown water aids the guile, To tempt the trout. The well-dissembled fly, The rod fine-tapering with elastic spring, Snatch'd from the hoary steed the floating line, And all thy slender watery stores prepare.

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