The Standard Fourth Reader: With Spelling and Defining Lessons, Exercises in Declamation, Etc. Part two

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J.L. Shorey, 1871 - 336 páginas
 

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Contenido

On Character
30
Catiline Denounced by Cicero
32
Turning Away Wrath
34
Last Days of Madame Roland
37
Caius Gracohus to the Romans
40
Remarkable Proridence
43
The Teachers Vocation Lord Brougham
45
The Simpleton and the Rogues
47
Reply to Lord Lyndhurst R L Shiel
51
Icebergs
54
The Worth of Fame Joanna Baillie 86
56
Anecdotes of a Skylark
58
The Paths of Success
61
Mazeppas Story Lord Byron
66
The Americans not to be Conquered John Wilkes
68
A Magpie at Church
70
On the Treatment of Books
72
The Good Time Coming Charles Mackay
75
Speech oi imuck Hawk 28 Catiline Expelled Cicero
79
The Custom of Dueling
80
The Highest Cataract in the World T S Kino
83
The Keeping of the Bridge Lord Macaulay
87
LESSOR AQB S3 The Second War with England Brown
95
Sunrise on Mount Etna P Brydone
97
Parting of Douglas and Marmion
98
Where is He? Henry Neele 102
102
The Retort
103
Marco Bozzaris FitzGreene Halleck
104
On Reconciliation with America Lord Chatham
105
will Try
108
The Two Homes Felicia Hemans
113
Warrens Address John Pierpont
114
Arnold the Teacher
115
The Good Great Man S T Coleridge
118
The Immortality of the Soul Massillon
119
40 Brevities Exercises in Level Delivery
121
The Dying Trumpeter Julius Moser
126
Bolla to the Peruvians R B Sheridan
127
True Gloryr Matthew Greene
128
Oliver Goldsmith Washington Irving
129
Address to an Egyptian Mummy
130
The Village Clergyman and Teacher Oliver Goldsmith
131
The Summons and the Lament
134
Pibroch of Donuil Dhu Sir Walter Scott
135
Joan of Are Thomas De Quincey
136
Breathes there a Man Sir Walter Scott
161
The Noblest Public Virtue Henry Clay
162
Live while you Live Philip Doddridge
163
Breathe Pure Air
164
The Paupers DeathBed Caroline B Southey
167
The American Robin Miss Cooper
168
The Study of Natural History
172
Catos Message to Csesar Joseph Addison
175
Lines to Little Mary Caroline B Southey
177
Woman in America Daniel Webster
178
Prayer Jakes Thomson
180
Christopher Columbus Washington Irving
182
The Story of Ginevra Samuel Rogers
183
Apostrophe to the Ocean Lord Byron
185
Influence of Human Example
187
Americas Obligations to England Isaac Barre
189
Right Against Might
191
Make Way for Liberty James Montgomery
193
Special Exercises in Elocution Part I 91
195
Special Exeroises from Shakspeare
198
Catiline to his Troops Rev Geo Croly
200
Song of Hiawatha H W Longfellow
201
The Champion Speller W Burton
202
Catos Soliloquy Joseph Addison
206
Marullus to the Mob Shakspeare
207
Barbarity of War Rev T Chalmers
208
Last Charge of Ney J T Headley
211
Cause for Indian Resentment Wm Wirt
215
The Fall of Constantinople Aubrey De Vere
222
The Boy Crusaders
226
The Reading of the Will
230
Allens Capture of Ticonderoga G Bancroft
235
Going up in a Balloon Charles Dickens 105 Early History of Kentucky
255
The Inquisitive Man John Poole
261
On Indifference ip Popular Eleotions G McDufpie 110 Death the Gate of Life Orville Dewey 2b6 111 Brutus on the Death of Caesar Shakspearb
267
Marie Antoinette Edmund Burke
270
Dr Arnold at Rugby Thomas Hughes
271
Hannibal to his Army Livy
274
Results of the American War C J Fox
277
Love is Power Robert Chambers
282
The Cholerie Father R B Sheridan
286
Special Exercises in ElocutionPart III
291
Columbus Discovers the New World Washington Irving
298
My Fathers Log Cabin Daniel Webster
302
Importance of Habit Samuel Smiles
303

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Página 281 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed. The mustering squadron, and the clattering car. Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war...
Página 331 - For I can raise no money by vile means: By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash By any indirection...
Página 155 - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: their soul is melted because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wit's end.
Página 280 - twas but the wind, Or the car rattling o'er the stony street; On with the dance! let joy be unconfined; No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the glowing Hours with flying feet But hark!
Página 132 - There, in his noisy mansion, skill'd to rule, The village master taught his little school ; A man severe he was, and stern to view, I knew him well, and every truant knew ; Well had the boding tremblers learn'd to trace The day's disasters in his morning face...
Página 267 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause ; and be silent that you may hear : believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Página 333 - With a bare bodkin ? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all...
Página 206 - Why shrinks the soul Back on herself, and startles at destruction ? 'Tis the divinity that stirs within us; 'Tis Heaven itself that points out an hereafter, And intimates eternity to man.
Página 158 - A land-breeze shook the shrouds, And she was overset; Down went the Royal George, With all her crew complete. Toll for the brave! Brave Kempenfelt is gone; His last sea-fight is fought; His work of glory done. It was not in the battle; No tempest gave the shock; She sprang no fatal leak ; She ran upon no rock.
Página 333 - That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin ? Who would fardels bear, To groan and sweat under a weary life ; But that the dread of something after death, — The undiscovered country, from whose bourn No traveller returns, — puzzles the will ; And makes us rather bear those ills we have, Than fly to others that we know not of?

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