History of Torrington, Connecticut: From Its First Settlement in 1737, with Biographies and Genealogies, Parte2

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J. Munsell, printer, 1878 - 817 páginas
 

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Página 384 - All is best, though we oft doubt, What the unsearchable dispose Of Highest Wisdom brings about, And ever best found in the close. Oft He seems to hide His face, But unexpectedly returns, And to His faithful champion hath in place Bore witness gloriously...
Página 383 - ... had I so interfered in behalf of the rich, the powerful, the intelligent, the so-called great, or in behalf of any of their friends...
Página 378 - I. John Brown, am now quite certain that the crimes of this guilty land will never be purged away but with blood. I had, as I now think vainly, flattered myself that without very much bloodshed it might be done.
Página 383 - I believe that to have interfered as I have done, as I have always freely admitted I have done, in behalf of His despised poor, I did no wrong, but right. Now, if it is deemed necessary that I should forfeit my life for the furtherance of the ends of justice, and mingle my blood further with the blood of my children and with the blood of millions...
Página 383 - I never did intend murder, or treason, or the destruction of property, or to excite or incite slaves to rebellion, or to make insurrection.
Página 383 - I have received on my trial. Considering all the circumstances, it has been more generous than I expected. But I feel no consciousness of guilt. I have stated from the first what was my intention and what was not. I never had any design against the life of any person, nor any disposition to commit treason, or excite slaves to rebel, or make any general insurrection. I never encouraged any man to do so, but always discouraged any idea of that kind.
Página 359 - The passage of the Potomac through the Blue Ridge is, perhaps, one of the most stupendous scenes in nature. You stand on a very high point of land. On your right comes up the Shenandoah, having ranged along the foot of the mountain an hundred miles to seek a vent.
Página 322 - To spy what danger on his pathway creeps; Go where he will, the wise man is at home, His hearth the earth, — his hall the azure dome; Where his clear spirit leads him, there's his road By God's own light illumined and foreshowed.
Página 376 - And they that shall be of thee shall build the old waste places : thou shalt raise up the foundations of many generations ; and thou shalt be called, The repairer of the breach, The restorer of paths to dwell in.
Página 359 - This scene is worth a voyage across the Atlantic. Yet here, as in the neighborhood of the Natural Bridge, are people who have passed their lives within half a dozen miles, and have never been to survey these monuments of a war between rivers and mountains, which must have shaken the earth itself to its centre.

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