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Conditional Sentence.

No. 2 a. Condition implied. The stem, which else had fallen quite. p. 8.

MARIANA.

Dependent Sentences. She said, 'I am aweary, aweary,

I would that I were dead!' p. 9. Oh God, that I were dead! p. 12.

TO

Conditional Sentence.

No. 3.
If aught of prophecy be mine,
Thou wilt not live in vain. p. 13.

Time Sentence.
Thy kingly intellect shall feed,

Until she be an athlete bold. p. 14.

MADELINE.

Relative Sentence.

Who may know Whether smile or frown be fleeter? Whether smite or frown be sweeter,

Who may know? p. 15.

Conditional Sentence.

Second Clause Indicative.
If my lips should dare to kiss
Thy taper fingers amorously,
Again thou blushest angerly. p. 16.

SECOND SONG.

TO THE OWL.
Conditional Sentence.

First Clause wanting.
I would mock thy chaunt anew :

But I cannot mimick it. p. 18.

ODE TO MEMORY.

Dependent Sentence.
For sure she deem'd no mist of earth could dull
Those spirit-thrilling eyes. p. 27.

Conditional Sentence.

Condition implied.
My friend, with you to live alone,
Were how much better than to own
A crown, a sceptre, and a throne. p. 30.

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Conditional Sentences.

First Clause wanting.
The flowers would faint at your cruel cheer.
There is frost in your breath
Which would blight the plants. p. 41.

No. 2 b.
It would fall to the ground, if you came in.
It would shrink to the earth, if you came in. p. 42.

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Conditional Sentences.

First Clause wanting.
Who would be

A merman bold?
I would be a merman bold;
I would sit and sing the whole of the day;
I would fill the sea-halls with a voice of power;
But at night I would roam abroad and play.

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I would kiss them often under the sea. p. 58.
There would be neither moon nor star;
But the wave would make music above us afar.
We would call aloud in the dreamy dells,

They would pelt me with starry spangles and shells.
I would throw to them back
We would live merrily. P. 59.

THE MERMAID.

Conditional Sentences.

First Clause wanting.
Who would be

A mermaid fair ?
I would be a mermaid fair;
I would sing to myself the whole of the day;

With a comb of pearl I would comb my hair,
And still as I comb'd I would sing.
I should look like a fountain of gold. p. 60.
At night I would wander away, away,
I would fling on each side my low-flowing locks.
We would run to and fro, and hide and seek.
I would not be kiss'd by all who would list.
They would sue me, and woo me, and fatter me.
The king of them all would carry me.
Then all the dry pied things that be
Would curl round my silver feet silently. p. 61.

No. 1. If I should carol aloud, from aloft All things Would lean out from the hollow sphere of the sea. p. 62.

No. 2 b. If any came near I would call, and shriek, And adown the steep like a wave I would leap. p. 61.

Time Sentences.
I would comb my hair till my ringlets would fall.
Till that great sea-snake under the sea
Would slowly trail himself sevenfold
And all the mermen under the sea
Would feel their immortality
Die in their hearts for the love of me. p. 61.

THE LADY OF SHALOTT.

Conditional Sentence.

No. 3.
A curse is on her, if she stay. p. 66.

Relative Sentence.
She knows not what the curse may be. p. 67.

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