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ACT II.

Conditional Sentences.

No. 1.

SC. I.

When we can entreat an hour to serve,
We would spend it in some words upon that business,

If you would grant the time. p. 28.
Sc. 3. If a man were porter of hell-gate, he should have old

turning the key. p. 32.

No. 2 a.

Sc. 2.

Had he not resembled
My father as he slept, I had done it. p. 30.
Sc. 3. Had I but died an hour before this chance,

I had liv'd a blessed time. p. 36.

No. 3.

SC. 2.

If he do bleed
I'll gild the faces of the grooms withal. P. 31.

Sc. I.

Condition implied.
Our will became the servant to defect;
Which else should free have wrought. p. 27.
To know my deed, 't were best not know myself. p. 32.

Sc. 2.

Sc. I.

Sc. 3

First Clause wanting.
A heavy summons lies like lead upon me,
And yet I would not sleep. p. 27.
The repetition in a woman's ear,
Would murther as it fell. p. 35.
God's benison go with you, and with those
That would make good of bad, and friends of foes. p. 39.

SC. 4.

Second Clause wanting.
As they had seen me with these hangman's hands. p. 30.

Sc. 2.

Sc. 4. Duncan's horses ..... broke their stalls, flung out,

Contending 'gainst obedience, as they would
Make war with mankind. p. 38.

Dependent Sentences.
Go, bid thy mistress, when my drink is ready,

She strike upon the bell. p. 1.
Sc. 2.
Wake Duncan with thy knocking! I would thou couldst.

p. 32. Sc. 4. Well; may you see things well done there :-adieu;

Lest our old robes sit easier than our new. p. 39.

SC. 1.

ACT III.

Conditional Sentences.

No. 1.

SC. 4.

am in blood
Stepp'd in so far, that, should I wade no more,
Returning were as tedious as go o'er. p. 53.

Sc. I.

No. 2 a.

If he had been forgotten
It had been as a gap in our great feast. p. 40.
Here had we now our country's honour roof'd,
Were the grac'd person of our Banquo present.

SC. 4.

p. 50.

SC. 4.

Sc. 6.

No. 2 b.

The times have been,
That, when the brains were out, the man would die. p. 51.

I do think,
That had he Duncan's sons under his key,
(As*, an't please heaven, he shall not,) they should find
+What 't were to kill a father; so should Fleance. p. 55.

Sc. I.

No. 3.

If there come truth from them, ...
May they not be my oracles as well? p. 40.

† Relative Clause.

* No. 3

Go not my horse the better,
I must become a borrower of the night. p. 41.

If it be so,
For Banquo's issue have I fild my mind. p. 42:

Banquo, thy soul's flight,
If it find heaven, must find it out to night. p. 45.
Sc. 6. Whom, you may say, if 't please you, Fleance kill'd. p. 55.

Sc. I.

SC. 2.

Condition implied.
We should have else desired your good advice. p. 40.
I would set my life on any chance to mend it. p. 44.

Then comes my fit again : I had else been perfect. p. 49. Sc. 6. 'Twould have anger'd any heart alive

To hear the men deny it. p. 55

SC. 4.

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Sc. I.

First Clause wanting.

In his royalty of nature
Reigns that which would be fear'd. p. 41.

All things else that might ...
Say, thus did Banquo. p. 43.

Though I could
With bare-fac'd power sweep him from my sight,

Yet I must not. p. 44.

That dare look on that
Which might appal the devil.
These flaws and starts .... would well become
A woman's story. p. 50.

That well might
Advise him to a caution. p. 56.

SC. 4•

Sc, 6.

Second Clause wanting.
Sc. 6. (He) hums; as who should say, &c. p. 56.

Sc. I

Dependent Sentences.

It was said
It should not stand in thy posterity;

Sc. 2.

SC. 4.

But that myself should be the root, and father
Of many kings. p. 40.
God be with you. P. 41.
Say to the king, I would attend his leisure.
Good digestion wait on appetite.
May it please your highness, sit. p. 50.

Would he were here. p. 51.
Sc. 6. That, by the help of these, we may again
Give to our tables meat, sleep to our nights.

Some holy angel
Fly to the court of England and unfold
* His message ere he come ; that a swift blessing
May soon return to this our suffering country. P. 56.

Time Sentences.

SC. 2.

SC. 4.

Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck,
Till thou applaud the deed. p. 47.
Strange things I have in head, that will to hand;
Which must be acted, ere they may be scann'd. p. 53.
I'll catch it ere it come to ground. p. 54.

Sc. 5.

ACT IV.

Conditional Sentences.

No. 1.

SC. 2.

Should I stay longer
It would be my disgrace, and your discomfort. p. 64.
If he were dead, you'd weep for him: if you would not,

it were a good sign that I should quickly have a new
father. p. 65.

Were I king,
I should cut off the nobles for their lands;

SC. 3.

* Time Sentence.

should forge Quarrels unjust against the good. p. 68.

Second Clause Indicative. Sc. 3. Though all things foul would wear the brows of grace,

Yet grace must still look so. p. 66.

No, 2 b.

Sc, 1.

Sc. 3.

Had I three ears I'd hear thee. p. 60.

Had I power, I should
Pour the sweet milk of concord into hell. p. 69.

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To what I ask you. p. 59.
If such a one be fit to govern, speak. p. 69.

If it be mine,
Keep it not from me. p. 72.

If he 'scape,
Heaven forgive him too. p. 73.

Sc. 2.

Condition implied.
To do worse to you were fell cruelty. p. 65.
Sc. 3. I would not be the villain that thou think'st

For the whole space that's in the tyrant's grasp,
And the rich East to boot. p. 67.

To relate the manner,
Were on the quarry of these murder'd deer
To add the death of you. p. 73.

Sc. 2.

First Clause wanting.
Poor bird! thou’dst never fear the net nor lime.
Why should I, mother? p. 64.
Whither should I Ay? p. 65.

What should he be? p. 67. .

SC. 3.

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