The British Poets: Including Translations ...

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C. Whittingham, 1822
 

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Página 99 - Men so rich a kingdom e hold ! .' And shame on you, O Men, which boast your strong And valiant hearts, in thoughts lesse hard and bold, Yet quaile in conquest of that Land of Gold ! But this to you...
Página 151 - Ne loose that he hath bound with stedfast band : In vaine therefore doest thou now take in hand To call to count, or weigh his workes anew, Whose counsels depth thou canst not understand ; Sith of things subiect to thy daily vew Thou doest not know the causes nor their courses dew.
Página 122 - So oft as I with state of present time The image of the antique world compare, When as mans age was in his freshest prime, And the first blossome of faire vertue bare, Such oddes I finde twixt those, and these which are, As that, through long continuance of his course, Me seemes...
Página 86 - That with thy smyling looke doest pacific The raging seas, and makst the stormes to flie ; Thee, goddesse, thee the winds, the clouds doe feare, And, when thou spredst thy mantle forth on hie, The waters play, and pleasant lands appeare, And heavens laugh, and al the world shews joyous cheare.
Página 83 - By her the heaven is in his course contained, And all the world in state unmoved stands, As their Almightie Maker first ordained, And bound them with inviolable bands -, Else would the waters overflow the lands, And fire devoure the ayre, and hell them quight ; But that she holds them with her blessed hands. She is the nourse of pleasure and delight, And unto Venus grace the gate doth open right.
Página 91 - She often prayd, and often me besought, Sometime with tender teares to let her goe, Sometime with witching smyles : but yet, for nought That ever she to me could say or doe, Could she her wished freedome fro me wooe...
Página 87 - Then doe the salvage beasts begin to play ' Their pleasant friskes, and loath their wontedfood: ' The lyons rore ; the tygers loudly bray ; ' The raging buls rebellow through the wood, ' And breaking forth dare tempt the deepest flood ' To come where thou doest draw them with desire...
Página 99 - Joy on those warlike women, which so long Can from all men so rich a kingdome hold ! And shame on you, O men ! which boast your strong And valiant hearts, in thoughts lesse hard and bold, Yet quaile in conquest of that land of gold.
Página 151 - For take thy ballaunce, if thou be so wise, And weigh the winde that under heaven doth blow ; Or weigh the light that in the east doth rise ; Or weigh the thought that from man's mind doth flow: But if the weight of these thou canst not show, Weigh but one word which from thy lips doth fall: For how canst thou those greater secrets know, That doest not know the least thing of them all ? Ill can he rule the great that cannot reach the small.
Página 89 - And next to her sate sober Modestie, Holding her hand upon her gentle hart ; And her against sate comely Curtesie, That unto every person knew her part ; And her before was seated overthwart Soft Silence, and submisse Obedience, Both linckt together never to dispart ; Both gifts of God not gotten but from thence ; Both girlonds of his Saints against their foes offence.

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