The British Essayists: Spectator

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James Ferguson
J. Richardson and Company, 1823
 

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Página 230 - OF man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse...
Página 232 - Almighty hath not built Here for his envy, will not drive us hence: Here we may reign secure, and, in my choice, To reign is worth ambition, though in hell: Better to reign in hell, than serve in heaven.
Página 341 - On our first father; half her swelling breast Naked met his under the flowing gold Of her loose tresses hid: he, in delight Both of her beauty and submissive charms, Smiled with superior love, as Jupiter On Juno smiles, when he impregns the clouds That shed May flowers...
Página 232 - Their dread commander ; he, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower ; his form had yet not lost All her original brightness, nor appeared Less than archangel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured...
Página 232 - Hail horrors, hail Infernal world, and thou profoundest Hell Receive thy new possessor; one who brings A mind not to be changed by place or time.
Página 163 - And Adam lived an hundred and thirty years, and begat a son in his own likeness, after his image; and called his name Seth...
Página 342 - Which they beheld, the moon's resplendent globe, And starry pole : Thou also mad'st the night, Maker Omnipotent, and thou the day...
Página 269 - To work in close design, by fraud or guile, What force effected not: that he no less At length from us may find, who overcomes By force hath overcome but half his foe. Space may produce new worlds...
Página 340 - So pass'd they naked on, nor shunn'd the sight Of God or Angel; for they thought no ill: So hand in hand they pass'd, the loveliest pair, That ever since in love's embraces met; Adam the goodliest man of men since born His sons, the fairest of her daughters Eve.
Página 58 - ¿Eneid also labours in this particular, and has episodes which may be looked upon as excrescences rather than as parts of the action. On the contrary, the poem which we have now under our consideration, hath no other episodes than such as naturally arise from the subject, and yet is filled with such a multitude of astonishing incidents...

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