Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field

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Cosimo, Inc., 2005 M11 1 - 292 páginas
And now the midnight draught of sleep, Where wine and spices richly steep, In massive bowl of silver deep, The page presents on knee.Lord Marmion drank a fair good rest, The captain pledged his noble guest, The cup went through among the rest, Who drained it merrily...-from MarmionFantastically successful when it was first published in 1808 and a bestseller throughout the 19th-century, this is Scott's epic poem of the 1513 Battle of Flodden Field, an enormous military disaster for Scotland in which the English killed King James IV and most of his nobles, and "all was lost," Scott said of the debacle, "but our honour." With a hero, Lord Marmion, who is by turns both upright and villainous, and its sweeping air of romantic and political intrigue, this rich tapestry of verse remains favorite of Scott devotees today.Scottish novelist and poet SIR WALTER SCOTT (1771-1832), a literary hero of his native land, turned to writing only when his law practice and printing business foundered. Among his most beloved works are The Lady of the Lake (1810), Rob Roy (1818), and Ivanhoe (1820).

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Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 15, 1771. He began his literary career by writing metrical tales. The Lay of the Last Minstrel, Marmion, and The Lady of the Lake made him the most popular poet of his day. Sixty-five hundred copies of The Lay of the Last Minstrel were sold in the first three years, a record sale for poetry. His other poems include The Vision of Don Roderick, Rokeby, and The Lord of the Isles. He then abandoned poetry for prose. In 1814, he anonymously published a historical novel, Waverly, or, Sixty Years Since, the first of the series known as the Waverley novels. He wrote 23 novels anonymously during the next 13 years. The first master of historical fiction, he wrote novels that are historical in background rather than in character: A fictitious person always holds the foreground. In their historical sequence, the Waverley novels range in setting from the year 1090, the time of the First Crusade, to 1700, the period covered in St. Roman's Well (1824), set in a Scottish watering place. His other works include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, and The Bride of Lammermoor. He died on September 21, 1832.

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