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being in a medley that afternoon liminary measure, seemed to reassure I wished to avoid the world; so I her. Then I told her the rest,-how threw myself on a bed of nettles, Arthur had grown ill over the phoand called myself a fool.

tograph, and I had taken his place. “What's done, Charlie Blake,' I How every one had greeted me as observed, 'can't be helped. For the Arthur, and I had been too cowardly future And then down below I to face an explanation. Then I saw Mary coming over the stile by asked her if she would not accord to herself, chopping off the heads of Charlie Blake the grace she would the flowers with her parasol. So I have given her cousin ? I had freely strolled down my bank, and met confessed her.

* And expect to be as freely for*Hasn't it been pleasant,' she said given, I suppose. Well, I don't see (by the way, I thought her face what else you can do, though it was looked very grave before she saw very wrong. There is one condition, me—but I wasn't up to young though, to the act of grace.' ladies),' and everybody charming • Well! What was it?'

Meaning I suppose thereby Mr. You will stay till Miss Mackenzie Gushington ?-to me he seems an comes—for an act of

penance. You insufferable puppy.'

are not obliged to make love to her, If ever a girl who didn't talk slang you know.' said, 'Oh, you muff!' with her eyes, . Thank you,' I said ; for I confess Mary said so then.

to a feeling of disappointment at There are many things worse the cavalier way in which she had than puppies,' said Miss Murphey, treated my offer. I felt piqued. colouring a little, and continuing to What can a man offer more than his chop.

hand, even though that hand be an *I am down--don't hit me, Mary, empty one? said I. 'Do you care for this red- She might be prudent; perhaps whiskered fellow ?'

she deemed such a hopeless attach• They aren't red, Arthur-but- ment not worth alluding to; still, no-I don't care for him’ (a little though prudence is doubtless an scornfully), and we were silent. estimable quality, yet a man may

How pretty she looked! I had desire other qualities in his fair one. made up my mind that I would go Something seemed to amuse her too. away without a word—but I could We were hardly out of the wood not-so I did it.' I told her how I when, standing still, Mary burst had come for the sake of the heiress forth into a peal of silvery laughter. who was to help us, and what a poor 'I cannot help it, Arthur; pray wretch I was, with a cartload of forgive it.' debts hanging about me—and how I felt angry in my heart at ber; before the heiress had come, she and I think Mary saw my disapbeing there—I-&c., &c., and how pointment and anger, as we silently useless it was. But though I could joined the rest of the party. I was not make love to her, I would not glad to get back-glad with a negastay and make it to any one else. I tive-gladness, when I put my compawould leave to-night, and try if nions again under the maternal there was nothing else but an heiress wing. There was nothing more to who would help to roll this heavy be done now. I went upstairs and load away from us.

packed my portmanteau. This was Her blue eyes had a curious look the first time I had meddled with in them when I paused. The worst young ladies, and it should be the had yet to be told.

last. Oh, you wise Solomon! What 'Arthur,' she began.

a world this would be if your Stay, Mary,' I said, and I felt a thoughts and your acts were the blush on my face, 'I am not Arthur.' same.

Not Arthur-not my cousin ?' I had only to say good-bye to She started back as if she were about Aunt Thoroughgood (London being to cry out 'murder,' or 'Mr. Gush- unable to settle its law-suits without ington;' but looking at me as a pre- me would explain matters in that pose!

quarter), and to bid that-young it was 1-only done by an amateur.' person farewell—who would doubt- (God bless him! I mentally added.) less hold out her pretty hand, smile, 'I stood too near--that made mo and go out to gather violets with look so gigantic, and then I moved that puppy, Gushington, five mi

--that deprived me of an eye. nutes afterwards.

We said you were like the Sphinx As I went downstairs a servant pyramid, Mary.' met me, not Saunders, but one of Mary laughed. “They said it was the housemaids, saying I was wanted not like me, and so I sent it. I in the library. Who is there?' I thought it would frighten all the inquired.

crows away; and when I heard you * Only Miss Mackenzie, sir,' Susan were still coming, I thought I would replied.

rely upon it not being like me. I Only Miss Mackenzie!' Well had a struggle with dear Aunty's really this was making a dead set at idea of deceit. She has had many a me ; she couldn't be going to pro- sigh over me; but as the servants

all call me “Miss Mary," I was safe; I would represent my forlorn con- -and so-and so I will forgive you dition in very plain terms, if I saw for all the pretty things you have a chance of it. Hang it! I wished said of me to my face, and will never I had gone straight off. I didn't do so any more.' wish Arthur at the Temple now. And then I stood before her, not

I went into the room, but there knowing what to say-wasn't the was no one but Mary. “Some one prize too great? told me Miss Mackenzie had come,' ‘Mr. Blake,' said Mary, coming I said. "Thank goodness she isn't towards me, and shyly holding out come-I hate seeing the woman.' her little white hand (which it is

'Hate seeing the woman !' said needless to say was soon in another Mary, with a little smile, which I larger and browner onc), you asked couldn't make out, and a bright me something this afternoon-shall colour in her cheeks.

I answer it now?-or do you still sure she isn't here, Arthur-I mean “hate the woman ?”? Mr. Blake-hovering about you in Did I hate the woman? No, I the shape of an invisible spirit?' don't think I did. I had loved her For once in my life I stared. for herself, and she knew it-s0 I

You won't notice her,' she went did not go away. on, 'even though she is before you. It was not fair that you should not I don't know what Arthur's feelbe Arthur, and I myself. You are ings were when he saw my pretty not like the knight in the fairy tale, bride, because I only thought about Mr. Blake, who found out the lady my own at that time. He had, even after she was changed into the however, a well-made coat on at cat, from the depth of feeling in her my wedding, which was paid formews.'

but-he did not dance-he sat apart, ‘But the photograph ?' I mur- and somewhat gloomy. mured feebly, not being myself. I keep the ugly photograph; for Indeed, an infant, so to speak, might I can never forget what I gained at that moment have knocked me and Arthur lost by amateur photodown. "Who was that?'

graphy. Here we may drop the 'I assure you,' she said, smiling, curtain.

"Are you

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THE LONDON OPERA DIRECTORS :

A SERIES OF CURIOUS ANECDOTIC MEMOIRS OF THE PRINCIPAL MEN CONNECTED

WITH THE DIRECTION OF THE OPERA ; THE INCIDENTS WHICH DISTINGUISHED THEIR MANAGEMENT; WITH REMINISCENCES OF CELEBRATED COMPOSERS AND THE LEADING SINGERS

WHO HAVE APPEARED BEFORE THE BRITISH PUBLIC.

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CHAPTER II. The King's Theatre and the Little

Theatre in the Haymarket. THE EARL OF MIDDLESEX, HANDEL'S SUC

CESSOR-GALUPPI, ‘IL BURANELLO FASHIONABLE SINGERS — VANESCHI MONTICELLI-A FAT PRIMA DONNA, OPERA IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY -SIGNOR AMICONI, SCENE PAINTER CASTRUCCI, THE ECCENTRIC FIDDLERVERACINI THE VAINGLORIOUS-FESTING THE GOOD-HEARTED-ORIGIN OF THE SOCIETY FOR THE SUPPORT OF DECAYED MUSICIANS AND THEIR FAMILIES-EFFECT OF THE REBELLION ON OPERATIC AFFAIRS-GEMINIANI THE ERRATIC — THE LITTLE THEATRE IN THE HAY

MARKET — GLUCK — REGINELLI - THE VOL. V.-NO. XXX.

EARL OF MIDDLESEX JOINED BY OTHEP.
NOBLEMEN, WHO FAIL – DR. CROZA-
FELICE GIARDINI - CUZZONI : THE CON-
SEQUENCES OF RECKLESS EXTRAVA-
GANCE-A DIVISION IN THE CAMP-
FLIGHT OF DR. CROZA-FASHIONABLE
AMUSEMENTS. [1741–1750.]
PERA Directors, above all other

mortals, refuse to profit by the warnings of their fellow-men, and persist in buying their own experience, generally at a most costly rate. Knowing the destiny from which scarcely one of their predecessors could escape, that failure is the rule, only proved by exceptional successes, they are stubborn in courting ruin.

2 D

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