The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets;: With Critical Observations on Their Works

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C. Bathurst, J. Buckland, W. Strahan, J. Rivington and Sons, T. Davies, T. Payne, L. Davis, W. Owen, B. White, S. Crowder, T. Caslon, T. Longman, ... [and 24 others], 1781 - 503 páginas
 

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Página 212 - Richard, with an air of the utmost importance, to come very early to his house the next morning. Mr. Savage came as he had promised, found the chariot at the door, and Sir Richard waiting for him, and ready to go out. What was intended, and whither they were to go, Savage could not conjecture, and was not willing to...
Página 63 - And terror on my aching sight ; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chilness to my trembling heart. Give me thy hand, and let me hear thy voice ; Nay, quickly speak to me, and let me hear Thy voice — my own affrights me with its echoes.
Página 257 - Should Dennis publish, you had stabb'd your Brother, Lampoon'd your Monarch, or debauch'd your Mother ; Say, what revenge on Dennis can be had ? Too dull for laughter, for reply too mad : On one so poor you cannot take the law; On one so old your sword you scorn to draw : Uncag'd then let the harmless monster rage, Secure in dulness, madness, want, and age.
Página 378 - ... nothing will supply the want of prudence; and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.
Página 213 - Savage then imagined his task over, and expected that Sir Richard would call for the reckoning, and return home; but his expectations deceived him, for Sir Richard told him that he was without money, and that the pamphlet must be sold before the dinner could be paid for...
Página 132 - The person who acted Polly, till then obscure, became all at once the favourite of the town ; her pictures were engraved, and sold in great numbers ; her life written; books of letters and...
Página 128 - Captives, which he was invited to read before the Princess of Wales. When the hour came, he saw the Princess and her ladies all in expectation, and, advancing with reverence too great for any other attention, stumbled at a stool, and, falling forwards, threw down a weighty Japan screen. The Princess started, the ladies screamed, and poor Gay, after...
Página 442 - How came you to leave all the great Lords, that you are so fond of, to come hither to see a poor Dean ? ' — Because we would rather see you than any of them.
Página 63 - He who reads these lines enjoys for a moment the powers of a poet ; he feels what he remembers to have felt before ; but he feels it with great increase of sensibility ; he recognizes a familiar image, but meets it again amplified and expanded, embellished with -beauty and enlarged with majesty.
Página 132 - This piece was received with greater applause than was ever known. Besides being acted in London sixtythree days without interruption, and renewed the next season with equal applause, it spread into all the great towns of England; was played in many places to the thirtieth and fortieth time ; at Bath and Bristol fifty, &c.

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