The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Comprehending an Account of His Studies and Numerous Works, in Chronological Order; a Series of His Epistolary Correspondence and Conversations with Many Eminent Persons; and Various Original Pieces of His Composition, Never Before Published. The Whole Exhibiting a View of Literature and Literary Men in Great-Britain, for Near Half a Century, During which He Flourished. In Two Volumes, Volumen1

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Henry Baldwin, 1791 - 516 páginas
 

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Contenido

Islam a description of ii 165
31
Porter Mrs afterward Johnsons wise i
46
TABLE OF CONTENTS
50
Mrs Lucy ii 34 306Johnsons
62
Montrosc late Duke of anecdote of ii 196
69
71
71
Strahan William Esq i 4 64 ii 275his Thomson Reverend James his cafe ii
74
319
77
Pringle Sir John ii
80
184 196 ii 27 100
83
86
86
Davies Mr Thomas character and anecdotes
90
Barnard Dr Bishop of Killaloe i 454 ii
92
Mungo ii 166
94
Dedications and Prefaces by Johnson
95
Lo vat Lord anecdotes of and epigram on i
97
Harris James Esq ii 199 207
100
345 ii 283
101
Earretier J P his life by Johnson i 77 81
102
Carleton Captain hisMemoirs ii 524
103
Lydiat i
104
Kelly Hugh Johnsons prologue to his Word
114
circumstances as to Johnson related
126
Cattle extraordinary ii
138
Chamberlayne Reverend Mr ii 498
146
Rasselas Prince of Abyssinia Johnsons u
149
Defoe Daniel ii 212
150
Kemble J P Esq ii 467
154
MACAULAY MrsJohnsons opinion of
164
Garricks Epigram on i 166
166
Reindeer of introducing into England i 366
168
Johnsons assistance to him ii 119 124
174
Reynolds Sir Joshua i 132444 ii 64331
181
Vanfittart Dr Robert i
189
Wine the use of i 378 380 u 20 64154
199
Macaulays account of St Kilda i 300
205
214 11 158
214
Virtue and Vice ii 263 j
223
jun his death and Johnsons letter on ii 62
225
400 515 ii 172 340
227
3 The Letters refer to the Volume the Figures to the Page
231
Rhyme its excellency i 232
232
38
236
298 330
245
365 si 1 242 405 424 438
249
Abjuration oath of i 463 Armorial bearings i 372
253
Birds their migration i 414
254
Vows ii
257
Kennicot Mrs ii 496 8
271
Wheeler Reverend Dr it
277
Rousseau i
278
Wraxall Mr ii
316
Riots in 1780 account of ii 317
317
National debt i 344
325
Study method of 1 233 258 of the Pulpit ii 79
327
Blackmore i
330
Whigs Johnsons definition of ii 399
333
Johnsons opinion of his works i 245 Ton Johnsons definition of ii 399
335
The World periodical essays i 228
337
94 9c 103 124 174 9 182
342
Blake Admiral his life by Johnson i 77
343
Falklands islands i
345
rature in The Royal Academy i 368 endeavour to get him into parliament
346
his life by Johnson ii 363 his Essay on the Life c of Johnson
348
Rising early ii 153
350
Martineili Signor his History of England i
357
T Traveller The Goldsmiths poem of i
359
Elwal the enthusiast 1
363
Rudd Mrs Margaret Caroline ii 90
365
Favours unreasonable i 200
367
191
369
347 ii 209
379
Fieldings works i 299 369 ii 66
380
Alfred Johnsons desire to write his life i 95
384
389
389
Fingal See Ossian
390
Scripturephrases i
392
Forbes Sir William ii 176
405
Whitefoord Caleb Esq ii
408
Mayo Reverend Dr i 417 18
414
America and The Americans i 444 5 458 BACON Lord Verulam ii 169
421
Eumelian club ii 567
424
118 120
429
Wales i
439
Peers ii 261
448
Future itate of man ii 173 225
450
Tale of a Tub i 24c 462 Travelling ii 4761 194213 233 270
458
249
462
370 ii
467
Simpson Joseph Esq anecdotes of i 266 ii 58
473
General warrants i 310
474
Hunter Mr i 13 14
475
172 Twisss travels in Spain 1
477
Patriotism i
478
Williams Mrs Anna i 127 228 252 323
483
India of the government in ii 451
484
catalogue of works proposed to
486
23 c
487
Lloyd Mr the Quaker ii 31
492
Modern Characters from Shakspeare ii 206
502
48 211 273
503

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Página 294 - Sir, you do not know it to be good or bad till the judge determines it. I have said that you are to state facts fairly; so that your thinking, or what you call knowing, a cause to be bad must be from reasoning, must be from your supposing your arguments to be weak and inconclusive.
Página 140 - Is not a Patron, My Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a Man struggling for Life in the water and when he has reached ground encumbers him with help?
Página 237 - When I was running about this town a very poor fellow, I was a great arguer for the advantages of poverty; but I was, at the same time, very sorry to be poor. Sir, all the arguments which are brought to represent poverty as no evil, show it to be evidently a great evil. You never find people labouring• to convince you that you may live very happily upon a plentiful fortune. So you hear people talking how miserable a king must be ; and yet they all wish to be in his place.
Página 139 - I had exhausted all the art of pleasing which a retired and uncourtly scholar can possess. I had done all that I could; and no man is well pleased to have his all neglected, be it ever so little.
Página 140 - The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labours, had it been early, had been kind ; but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it ; till I am solitary, and cannot impart it ; till I am known, and do not want it.
Página 241 - One day when I was at her house, I put on a very grave countenance, and said to her, ' Madam, I am now become a convert to your way of thinking. I am convinced that all mankind are upon an equal footing ; and to give you an unquestionable proof, Madam, that I am in earnest, here is a very sensible, civil, well-behaved fellow-citizen, your footman; I desire that he may be allowed to sit down and dine with us.
Página 223 - I was dressed and found that his landlady had arrested him for his rent, at which he was in a violent passion. I perceived that he had already changed my guinea, and had got a bottle of Madeira and a glass before him.
Página 250 - I could not find words to express what I felt upon this unexpected and very great mark of his affectionate regard. Next day, Sunday, July 31, I told him I had been that morning at a meeting of the people called Quakers, where I had heard a woman preach. JOHNSON. " Sir, a woman's preaching is like a dog's walking on his hind legs. It is not done well ; but you are surprised to find it done at all.
Página 9 - There are many who think it an Act of Piety to hide the Faults or Failings of their Friends, even when they can no longer suffer by their Detection; we therefore see whole Ranks of Characters adorned with uniform Panegyrick, and not to be known from one another, but by extrinsick and casual Circumstances. "Let me remember...
Página 139 - Dictionary is recommended to the public, were written by your Lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge.

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