The Poetical Works of Richard Savage

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William A. Davis, no. 39 William-street., 1805 - 271 páginas
 

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Página 10 - ... zeal, related his misfortunes, applauded his merit, took all the opportunities of recommending him, and asserted that " the inhumanity of his mother had given him a right to find every good man his father.
Página 17 - During a considerable Part of the Time, in which he was employed upon this Performance, he was without Lodging, and often without Meat ; nor had he any other Conveniences for Study than the Fields or the Streets allowed him, there he used to walk and form his Speeches, and afterwards step into a Shop, beg for a few Moments the Use of the Pen and Ink, and write down what he had composed upon Paper which he had picked up by Accident.
Página 92 - He was of a middle stature, of a thin habit of body, a long visage, coarse features, and melancholy aspect; of a grave and manly deportment, a solemn dignity of mien ; but which, upon a nearer acquaintance, softened into an engaging easiness of manners.
Página 4 - Macclesfield, having lived for some time upon very uneasy terms with her husband, thought a public confession of adultery the most obvious and expeditious method of obtaining her liberty ; and therefore declared, that the child, with which she was then great, was begotten by the Earl Rivers.
Página 66 - ... always accustomed to an irregular manner of life, he could not confine himself to any stated hours, or pay any regard to the rules of a family, but would prolong his conversation till midnight, without considering that business might require his friend's application in the morning...
Página 94 - He appeared to think himself born to be supported by others, and dispensed from all necessity of providing for himself; he therefore never prosecuted any scheme of advantage, nor endeavoured even to secure the! profits which his writings might have afforded him.
Página 3 - That affluence and power, advantages extrinsic and adventitious, and therefore easily separable from those by whom they are possessed, should very often flatter the mind with expectations of felicity which they cannot give, raises no astonishment ; but it seems rational to hope, that intellectual greatness should produce better effects ; that minds qualified for great attainments should first endeavour their own benefit; and that they who are most able to teach others the way to happiness, should...
Página 11 - Richard would call for the reckoning, and return home ; but his expectations deceived him, for Sir Richard told him that he was without money, and that the pamphlet must be sold before the dinner could be paid for...
Página 33 - But this is only an instance of that partiality which almost every man indulges with regard to himself: the liberty of the press is a blessing when we are inclined to write against others, and a calamity when we find ourselves overborne by the multitude of our assailants...
Página 9 - Mason, which informed him of his birth, and the reasons for which it was concealed. He was no longer satisfied with the employment which had been allotted him, but thought he had a right to share the affluence of his mother...

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