Cheerful thoughts of a cheery philosopher, Volumen2

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S. Low, Marston, 1894

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Página 198 - Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you For every day. Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever ; Do noble things, not dream them, all day long : And so make life, death, and that vast for-ever One grand, sweet song.
Página 262 - At his first settling with me, I made him a present of all the good sermons which have been printed in English, and only begged of him that every Sunday he would pronounce one of them in the pulpit Accordingly he has digested them into such a series, that they follow one another naturally, and make a continued system of practical divinity.
Página 283 - Of no more subtle master under heaven Than is the maiden passion for a maid, Not only to keep down the base in man, But . teach high thought, and amiable words And courtliness, and the desire of fame, And love of truth, and all that makes a man.
Página 2 - O give us the man who sings at his work ; be his occupation what it may, he is equal to any of those who follow the same pursuit in silent sullenness. He will do more in the same time — he will do it better — he will persevere longer. One is scarcely sensible of fatigue whilst he marches to music. The very stars are said to make harmony as they revolve in their spheres.
Página 41 - How small, of all that human hearts endure, The part that kings or IIHVB can caneo or care I ' "Now, the truth is, that kings or laws can cause or cure...
Página 274 - We cannot all have our gardens now, nor our pleasant fields to meditate in at eventide. Then the function of our architecture is, as far as may be, to replace these; to tell us about Nature; to possess us with memories of her quietness; to be solemn and full of tenderness, like her, and rich in portraitures of her; full of delicate imagery of the flowers we can no more gather, and of the living creatures now far away from us in their own solitude.
Página 2 - The way to this, is to keep our bodies in exercise,. our minds at ease' That insipid state wherein neither are in vigour, is not to be accounted any part of our portion of being. When we are in the satisfaction of some innocent pleasure, or pursuit of some laudable design, we are in the possession of life, of human life. Fortune will give us disappointments enough, and nature is attended with infirmities enough, without our adding to the unhappy side of our account by our spleen or illhumour.
Página 258 - So that, until the servants and ministers of the living God do pass the limits of pulpit theology and pulpit exhortation, and take weapons in their hand, gathered out of every region in which the life of man or his faculties are interested...
Página 274 - We are forced, for the sake of accumulating our power and knowledge, to live in cities : but such advantage as we have in association with each other is in great part counterbalanced by our loss of fellowship with nature. We cannot all have our gardens now, nor our pleasant fields to meditate in at eventide. Then the function of our architecture is, as far as may be, to replace these ; to tell us about nature...
Página 259 - They prepare for teaching gipsies, for teaching bargemen, for teaching miners, by apprehending their way of conceiving and estimating truth ; and why not prepare...

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