Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Libros Libros 1 - 10 de 153 sobre Thirdly, the supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without...
" Thirdly, the supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the... "
Political Register and Impartial Review of New Books - Página 185
1769
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

A Treatise Concerning Civil Government, Partes1-3

Josiah Tucker - 1781 - 428 páginas
...Individual among the Peoples '• For even the Supreme Power [the Legifla" 4ure] cannot [lawfully or juftly] take from " any Man any Part of his Property without " his own Confent." This is Mr. LOCKE'S own Declaration. And Mr. MOLINEUX corroborates it by another ftill ftronger, viz....
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The History of England: From the Accession of King George the ..., Volumen1

John Adolphus - 1802
...fpoke with entluifiaftic, but perhaps exaggerated admiration of Locke's principle, that the fnpreine power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own confent, and refufed his afl'cnt to any bill for taxing the American colonies, while they remained unrepresented....
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The history of England, from the accession of George iii to 1783, Volumen1

John Adolphus - 1810
...proprietor." He fpoke with enthufiaftic, but perhaps exaggerated admiration, of Locke's principle, that the fupreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own confent ; and refufed his aflent to any bill for taxing the American colonies, while they remained unreprefented....
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Parliamentary History of England, from the Earliest Period to the Year ...

William Cobbett - 1813
...always nicely correct in his expression. For one instance, he says, in one place, that ' the supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his consent, because the end of government is to secure property.' Yet would not any man be justly laughed...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

Principles and Acts of the Revolution in America: Or, An Attempt to Collect ...

Hezekiah Niles - 1822 - 495 páginas
...much in favor of my sentiments, I beg your lordship's leave to read a little of his book. "The supreme power cannot take from any man, any part of his property without his own consent;" and It. II. p. 136—139, particularly 140. Such are the words of this great man, and which...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

Captain Rock: Or, The Chieftain's Gazette for the Year 1827

1827 - 186 páginas
...deprived unjustly of their property, a.nd by force without right; for "the supreme power," says Locke, "cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

A Political and Civil History of the United States of America ..., Volumen1

Timothy Pitkin - 1828
...and private property — it is a fundamental principle of the British constitution, that the supreme power cannot take from any man, any part of his property without his consent, in person or by representation, that is, taxes are not to be laid on the * people but by their...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

Cobbett's Weekly Register, Volumen83

1834
...that herein consists the security of property is clearly proved bv LOCKE, who says, " The " supreme power cannot take from any " man any part of his property without " his own consent." Men, he shows, must be in this condition of true freedom, or " they have no property at all...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

THE FOREIGN QUARTERLY REVIEW

BLACK AND ARMSTRONG - 1838
...Edit. 1772. Another part of his doctrine, of which more use has been made is, that even the supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent, (sec. 138); but this is explained to mean, that all men may be called upon to pay their proportion...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro

The Moderate Monarchy, Or Principles of the British Constitution, Described ...

Albrecht von Haller - 1849 - 344 páginas
...terms of force to maintain it, whether invaded by a single man, or many in combination. "The supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter...
Vista completa - Acerca de este libro




  1. Mi biblioteca
  2. Ayuda
  3. Búsqueda avanzada de libros
  4. Descargar EPUB
  5. Descargar PDF