The National Preceptor: Or, Selections in Prose and Poetry, Consisting of Narrative, Descriptive, Argumentative, Didactic, Pathetic, and Humorous Pieces, Together with Dialogues, Addresses, Orations, Speeches, &c. ...

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Goodwin, 1830 - 312 páginas

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Página 134 - all did see, that, on the Lupercal, I thrice presented him a kingly crown ; Which he did thrice refuse : Was this ambition ? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And sure he is an honorable man. 5. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke : But here I am to speak what I do know.
Página 135 - put it on ; ? Twas on a summer's evening in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii* Look ! in this place ran Cassius' dagger through See what a rent the envious Casca made Through this the well beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Cesar follow'd it!
Página 137 - spread the truth from pole to pole. 3. What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball? What though no real voice nor sound Amid these radiant orbs be found ? In reason's ear they all rejoice, And utter forth a glorious voice, Forever singing, as they shine,
Página 127 - actually begun ! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field ! Why stand we here idle ? What is it that gentlemen wish ? What would they have ? Is life so dear, or peace so
Página 136 - But, as you. know me all, a plain, blunt man, That love my friend—and that they knew full well, That gave me public leave to speak of him ! For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor power of speech, To stir men's blood.
Página 127 - 2. For heaven's sake, let us sit upon the ground. And tell sad stories of the death of kings :— How some have been depos'd, some slain in war ; Some haunted by the ghosts they have* depos'd ; Some poison'd by their wives, some sleeping kill'd ; All murder'd
Página 107 - a kiss; Perhaps a tear, if souls can weep in bliss : Ah that maternal smile! it answers—Yes, 2. I heard the bell toll'd on thy burial day ; I saw the hearse that bore thee slow away ; And, turning from my nurs'ry window, drew A long, long sigh, and wept a last adieu. But was it such
Página 92 - The next, .with dirges due, in sad array, Slow through the churchway path we saw him borne. Approach and read (for thou canst read) the lay, Graved on the stone beneath yon aged thorn." THE EPITAPH. 30. HERE rests his head, upon the lap
Página 135 - 8. If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle : I remember The first time ever Cesar put it on ; ? Twas on a summer's evening in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii* Look ! in this place ran Cassius' dagger through See what a rent the envious Casca made Through this the
Página 131 - Dar'st them, Cassius, now Leap in with me into this angry flood, And swim to yonder point ?"—Upon the word, Accoutred as I was, I plunged in, And bade him follow; so indeed he did. The torrent roar'd, and we did buffet it; With lusty sinews throwing it aside,

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