What Your First Grader Needs to Know: Fundamentals of a Good First-grade Education

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Dell, 1998 - 342 páginas
Give your child a smart start with
What Your First Grader Needs to Know

What will your child be expected to learn in the first grade? How can you help him or her at home? How can teachers foster active, successful learning in the classroom? This book answers these all-important questions and more, offering the specific shared knowledge that hundreds of parents and teachers across the nation have agreed upon for American first graders. Featuring a new Introduction, filled with opportunities for reading aloud and fostering discussion, this first-grade volume of the acclaimed Core Knowledge Series presents the sort of knowledge and skills that should be at the core of a challenging first-grade education. Inside you'll discover

Favorite poems—old and new, such as “The Owl and the Pussycat,” “Wynken, Blynken, and Nod,” and “Thirty Days Hath September”
Beloved stories—from many times and lands, including a selection of Aesop's fables, “Hansel and Gretel,” “All Stories Are Anansi's,” “The Tale of Peter Rabbit,” and much more
Familiar sayings and phrases—such as “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” and “Practice makes perfect”
World and American history and geography—take a trip down the Nile with King Tut and learn about the early days of our country, including the story of Jamestown, the Pilgrims, and the American Revolution
Visual arts—fun activities plus full-color reproductions of masterworks by Leonardo da Vinci, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Cézanne, Georgia O'Keeffe, and others
Music—engaging introductions to great composers and music, including classical music, opera, and jazz, as well as a selection of favorite children's songs
Math—a variety of activities to help your child learn to count, add and subtract, solve problems, recognize geometrical shapes and patterns, and learn about telling time
Science—interesting discussions of living things and their habitats, the human body, the states of matter, electricity, our solar system, and what's inside the earth, plus stories of famous scientists such as Thomas Edison and Rachel Carson

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - Marse - LibraryThing

The readings are a little longer and more facts and information are included in the readings. I noticed that a couple of the nursery rhymes were repeated from the kindergarten book, and even a fairy ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - mljousma - LibraryThing

This series of books in general is very helpful to any homeschooling parent. I was able to take this book and expand it into an entire curriculum using their outline as a base and adding in their ... Leer comentario completo

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Acerca del autor (1998)

Hirsch is a conservative critic best known for his repudiation of critical approaches to literature (chiefly poststructuralism and New Criticism) that assume that the author's intentions do not determine readings. He argues that any such methodology is guilty of "the organic fallacy," the belief that the text leads a life of its own. For Hirsch, the author's authority is the key to literary interpretation: The critic's job is to reproduce textual meaning by recovering the author's consciousness, which guarantees the validity of an interpretation. In his two most important books, Validity in Interpretation (1967) and its sequel, The Aims of Interpretation (1976), Hirsch warns against the "critical anarchy" that follows from the "cognitive atheism" of both relativism and subjectivism. For him, these result from a corollary of the organic fallacy, the thesis that meaning is ultimately indeterminate because it changes over time or with the differing interests and values of different readers. According to Hirsch, meaning does not change; only value or significance does, as readers relate a text's fixed meaning to their cultures. If there is more than one valid interpretation of a text, it is because literature may be reduced to more than one "intrinsic genre" or meaning type---the particular set of conventions governing ways of seeing and of making meaning at the time the author was writing. Many critics suggest that the intentions Hirsch recovers in intrinsic genres are really his own, rather than those of the author, because no one, including Hirsch, can escape his or her historically conditioned frame of reference when developing interpretations of literature. Hirsch's recent books, including Cultural Literacy (1987), are seen as proof of those flaws by those who are troubled by the history and values of the dominant culture that Hirsch insists is the only culture. Hirsch argues that "common knowledge" is being denied minority students and others by feminists and other "radicals" who have undermined the authority of its great texts.

Holdren has been a teacher of writing and literature at the University of Virginia and Harvard University, and is now Director of Research and Communications of the Core Knowledge Foundation.

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