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FROM IN MEMORIAM

39

At dawn of morn, and close of even,
To lift your heart and hands to Heaven.
In double duty, say your prayer:
Our Father first, then Notre Père.

And, dearest child, along the day,
In every thing you do and say,
Obey and please my lord and lady,
So God shall love and angels aid ye..

If to these precepts you attend,
No second letter need I send,
And so I rest your constant friend.

MATTHEW PRIOR

FROM “IN MEMORIAM”

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,

The flying cloud, the frosty light:

The year is dying in the night; Ring out, wild bells, and let him die,

Ring out the old, ring in the new,

Ring, happy bells, across the snow:

The year is going, let him go; Ring out the false, ring in the true.

! Ring out the grief that saps the mind,

For those that here we see no more;

Ring out the feud of rich and poor, Ring in redress to all mankind.

Ring out a slowly dying cause,

And ancient forms of party strife;

Ring in the nobler modes of life, With sweeter manners, purer laws.

Ring out the want, the care, the sin,

The faithless coldness of the times;

Ring out, ring out my mournful rhymes, But ring the fuller minstrel in.

Ring out false pride in place and blood,

The civic slander and the spite;

Ring in the love of truth and right, Ring in the common love of good.

King out old shapes of foul disease;

Ring out the narrowing lust of gold;

Ring out the thousand wars of old, Ring in the thousand years of peace.

Ring in the valiant man and free,

The larger heart, the kindlier hand;

Ring out the darkness of the land, Ring in the Christ that is to be.

ALFRED TENNYSON THE BELLS OF LONDON

31

NURSERY RHYMES

THE BELLS OF LONDON

GAY go up and gay go down,
To ring the bells of London town.

Halfpence and farthings,
Say the bells of St. Martin's.

Oranges and lemons,

Say the bells of St. Clement's.
Pancakes and fritters,
Say the bells of St. Peter's.

Two sticks and an apple,
Say the bells of Whitechapel.

Kettles and pans,
Say the bells of St. Ann's.

You owe me ten shillings,
Say the bells of St. Helen's.

When will you pay me?

Say the bells of Old Bailey.
When I grow rich,

Say the bells of Shoreditch.
Pray when will that be?
Say the bells of Stepney.

I am sure I don't know,
Says the great bell of Bow.

JOHNNY SHALL HAVE A NEW BONNET

JOHNNY shall have a new bonnet,

And Johnny shall go to the fair,
And Johnny shall have a blue ribbon

To tie up his bonny brown hair.

And why may not I love Johnny?

And why may not Johnny love me?
And why may not I love Johnny

As well as another body?

And here's a leg for a stocking,

And here's a leg for a shoe;
And he has a kiss for his daddy,
And two for his

mammy,

I trow.

And why may not I love Johnny?

And why may not Johnny love me?
And why may not I love Johnny

As well as another body?

THE FROG HE WOULD A-WOOING RIDE

It was the frog in the well,

Humble dum, humble dum,
And the merry mouse in the mill,

Tweedle, tweedle, twino.

The frog would a-wooing ride,

Humble dum, humble dum,

THE FROG HE WOULD A-WOOING RIDE 33

Sword and buckler by his side,

Tweedle, tweedle, twino.

When upon his high horse set,

Humble dum, humble dum,
His boots they shone as black as jet,

Tweedle, tweedle, twino.

When he came to the merry mill pin,
Lady Mouse beene you within?
Then came out the dusty mouse,
I am lady of this house;

Hast thou any mind of me?
I have e'en great mind of thee.
Who shall this marriage make?
Our lord, which is the rat.

What shall we have to our supper?
Three beans in a pound of butter.
But, when supper they were at,
The frog, the mouse, and e'en the rat,

Then came in Tib, our cat,
And caught the mouse e'en by the back,
Then did they separate:
The frog leapt on the floor so flat;

Then came in Dick, our drake,
And drew the frog e'en to the lake,

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