An Historical Account of the Origin of the Commission Appointed to Inquire Concerning Charities in England and Wales; and an Illustration of Several Old Customs and Words, which Occur in the Reports

Portada
Payne and Foss, 1828 - 330 páginas
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 312 - fairest flowers, Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave: Thou shalt not lack The flower, that's like thy face, pale primrose ; nor The azur'd hare-bell, like thy veins; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, . Out-sweeten'd not thy breath.— Cymbeline, Act. iv.
Página 313 - shall not lack The flower, that's like thy face, pale primrose ; nor The azur'd hare-bell, like thy veins; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, . Out-sweeten'd not thy breath.— Cymbeline, Act. iv. Sc. 2. 7 POCOCKE'S Descript. of the East, vol. i. p. 192.
Página 312 - hare-bell, like thy veins; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, . Out-sweeten'd not thy breath.— Cymbeline, Act. iv. Sc. 2. 7 POCOCKE'S Descript. of the East, vol. i. p. 192. 8 TUCKEY'S Narrative, p. 382. In 1652, EDWARD ROSE, by his Will, directed his body to be buried in the church-yard of Barnes, and bequeathed
Página 313 - fairest flowers, Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave: Thou shall not lack The flower, that's like thy face, pale primrose ; nor The azur'd hare-bell, like thy veins; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, . Out-sweeten'd not thy breath.— Cymbeline, Act. iv.
Página 208 - the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings lean'd to Virtue's side; But in his duty prompt at every call, He watch'd and wept, he pray'd and felt for all.
Página 264 - 33. to which belonged spits, crocks, &c., utensils for dressing Provision. Here the Housekeepers met, and were merry, and gave their charity. The young people were there too, and had dancing, bowling, shooting at butts, &c., the ancients sitting gravely by, and looking on. All things were civil, and without scandal. The Church-Ale is doubtless derived from the
Página 309 - time after his death, continued to deck his Tomb with spring and summer flowers? It is to this circumstance that Lord Byron alludes,— When NERO perish'd by the justest doom Which ever the destroyer yet destroy'd, Amidst the roar of liberated Rome, Of Nations freed, and the World o'erjoy'd, Some hands unseen
Página 236 - Imagination fondly stoops to trace The parlour splendours of that festive place; The white-wash'd wall, the nicely sanded floor, The varnish'd clock that click'd behind the door. The
Página 232 - he dined and dressed his meat:— " The second is, the great amendment " of Lodging,—for, said they, our fathers, " and we ourselves, have lain full oft upon " straw pallettes covered only with a sheet " under coverlets made of dagswaine*
Página 225 - HENTZNER, when describing the manners of the English, says, " they are pow" erful in the field, successful against " their enemies, impatient of any thing "like Slavery, — vastly fond of great " noises that fill the ear, such as the firing " of cannon, drums, and the ringing of

Información bibliográfica