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There is something in the fond expression of good ship, in the last line but one, which strikes me with an idea of a peculiar tenderness in her compassion for the unhappy sufferers.

Profpero, confessing the mad folly of trusting his reins of administration into other hands, says,

The Government I calt upon my brother,

And to my State grew franger.
And again, speaking of the same person,

Being once perfected how to grant suits,
How to deny them ; whom to advance, and whom
To trash for over-topping ; new created

The creatures that were mine; I say, or changed them,
Or elle new formed them; having both the key
Of officer and office, set all things in the state
To what tune pleased his ear; that now be was
The ivy which bad bid my princely trunk,
And fucked my verdure out cn't.
In continuation,

And my trust, Like a good parent, did beget of him A falsehood in its contrary as great As my trust was; which had, indeed, no limit : A confidence fans bound. He being thus lorded, Not only with what my revenue yielded, But what my power might else exact ; like one, Who having, unto truth, by telling oft, Made such a finner of his memory, To credit his own lie, he did believe He was, indeed, the Duke ; from substitution, And executing the outward face of Royalty, With all prerogative. Hence his ambition growing, To have no screen between the part he played, And him he played it for, he needs will be Absolute Milan. In this account of the Duke's weakness, with the natural consequences attending it, the Poet has afforded a proper leffon to princes, never to render themselves cyphers in their government, by too dangerous a confidence in their favourites; but ever to consider those persons, to whom they depute the several offices of State, as ministers, in the literal sense of the word, only, not in the political one.

B 3

When

When Prospero defcribes the hazards and difficulties of his forlorn voyage, Miranda tenderly exclaims,

Alack ! what trouble

Was I then to you? To which he, in a kind of extasy of fondness, replies,

O! a cherubim Thou wait, that did preserve me. Thou didt smile, Infused with a fortitude from Heaven, (When I have decked the sea with drops full falt; Under my burden groaned ;) which raised in me An undergoing ftomach, to bear up Against what ihould ensue. Here the Poet finely points to that virtue of true manhood, which serves to strengthen our fortitude and double our activity, when objects, whom the ties of Nature, or the sympathy of affections, have endeared to us, require our solace or assistance in distress or danger. While our cares center solely in ourselves, we are but one ; but become two, where the heart is shared.

Profpero. Here in this island we arrived, and here

Have ), thy schoolmaster, made thee more profit
Than other princes can, that have more time

For vainer hours, and tutors not so careful. Here the too general dissipations of life are hinted at, and those parents censured, who transfer the pious duty of their children's education to mercenary preceptors ; except in the meaner articles of it, the arts, exercises, and sciences. Too few attend to the higher and more interesting charge, of forming the mind and directing the heart to their proper objects; and fewer still, in deputing it to others, seem to regard the chief requisites, of character, or capacity, in those they intrust with this office, looking upon competent scholarship to be alone fufficient.

But a liberal education, as far as it extends in Col. leges and Schools, does not always give a liberal

mind; and as example is allowed to exceed precept, so do those sentiments and principles which we imbibe in youth from the living manners of our tutors,

“ Grow with our growth, and strengthen with our strength. Those only are capable of sinking into the heart, and imbuing the mind, while mere didactic maxims remain a load upon the memory alone. The first only inspire us how to act, the latter but instru&

tus bove to speak.

Prospero. And by my prescience

I find, my zenith doth depend upon
A moit auspicious ftar ; whose influence
If now I court not, but omit, my fortunes

Will ever after droop. This passage furnishes a prudent and necessary reflection to the mind of the reader, that man's success in life often depends upon some lucky and critical occasion, which, suffered to Nip by, may ne'er return again. Shakespeare expresses himself more fully on this subject, in another place *. Some other poet too presents us with a poetical image to the same purpose, where he says that “ opportunity is “ bald behind t."

SCENE

Prospero to Ariel.
Doft thou forget

From what a torment I did free thee? Doctor Johnson, in a note upon this paffage, has given us the traditionary system of the Hebrews relative to the Fallen Angels; which has afforded me a hint, that tempts me to consider the tenor of this scene in a more interesting light, by observing upon the impatience of Ariel, a condemned spirit, claiming, under his servitude, the promised redemption, before he had fulfilled the commands of his master. This allusion, whether Shakespeare intended it or no, is so obvious, that there would not require the • « There is a tide in the affaise of men,” &c.

JUL. Cæs. Ad iv, Scene sa † Poft occafio calva,

B 4

alteration

When Prospero defcribes the hazards and difficulties of his forlorn voyage, Miranda tenderly exclaims,

Alack ! what trouble

Was I then to you? To which he, in a kind of extasy of fondness, replies,

O! a cherubim Thou wast, that did preserve me. Thou didft smile, Infused with a fortitude from Heaven, (When I have decked the sea with drops full falt; Under my burden groaned ;) which raised in me An undergoing ftomach, to bear up Against what Ihould ensue. Here the Poet finely points to that virtue of true manhood, which serves to strengthen our fortitude and double our activity, when objects, whom the ties of Nature, or the sympathy of affections, have endeared to us, require our solace or assistance in distress or danger. While our cares center solely in ourfelves, we are but one ; but become two, where the heart is shared.

Profpero. Here in this island we arrived, and here

Have I, thy schoolmaster, made thee more profit Than other princes can, that have more time For vainer hours, and tutors not so careful. Here the too general dissipations of life are hinted at, and those parents censured, who transfer the pious duty of their children's education to inercenary preceptors; except in the meaner articles of it, the arts, exercises, and sciences. Too few attend to the higher and more interesting charge, of forming the mind and directing the heart to their proper objects; and fewer ftill

, in deputing it to others, seem to regard the chief requisites, of character, or capacity, in those they intrust with this office, looking upon competent scholarship to be alone fufficient.

But a liberal education, as far as it extends in Col. lcges and Schools, does not always give a liberal

mind; and as example is allowed to exceed precept, so do those sentiments and principles which we imbibe in youth from the living manners of our tutors,

Grow with our growth, and strengthen with our strength." Those only are capable of sinking into the heart, and imbuing the mind, while mere didactic maxims remain a load upon the memory alone. The first only inspire us how to act, the latter but instru&t us bere to speak.

Prospero. And hy my prescience

I find, my zenith doth depend upon
A moit auspicious ftar ; whose influence
If now I court not, but omit, my fortunes

Will ever after droop. This passage furnishes a prudent and necessary reflection to the mind of the reader, that man's success in life often depends upon some lucky and critical occasion, which, suffered to Nip by, may ne'er return again. Shakespeare expresses himself more fully on this subject, in another place *. Some other poet too presents us with a poetical image to the same purpose, where he says that “ opportunity is « bald behind t."

SCENE

Prospero to Ariel.
Doft thou forget

From what a torment I did free thee ? Doctor Johnson, in a note upon this passage, has given us the traditionary system of the Hebrews relative to the Fallen Angels; which has afforded me a hint, that tempts me to consider the tenor of this scene in a more interesting light, by observing upon the impatience of Ariel, à condemned spirit, claiming, under his servitade, the promised redemption, before he bad fulfilled the commands of his master. This allusion, whether Shakespeare intended it or no, is so obvious, that there would not require the •« There is a tide in the affaids of men,” &c.

JUL, CAS. Ad iv, Scene su † Poft occafio calva.

alteration

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