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alteration of a syllable, to have it inserted among the Mysteries*. Men wouid be Christians upon their own terms, only, and are too apt to think that faith and fear, without love or works, are sufficient for the purpose.

А стІІ. . SCENE I. Gonzalo, comforting and cheering up the spirits of his companions in the wreck, speaks with a becoming refignation and proper gratitude towards Providence :

Beseech you, Sir, be merry -- you have cause,
So have we all, of joy! for our escape
Is inuch beyond our lors: our hint of woe
Is common: every day fome failor's wife,
The matter or some merchant, and the merchant,
Have just our theme of woe : But for the miracle,
I mean our prefervation, iew in millions
Can speak like us : Tben wiley, 89.1 Sir, weigh
Our sorrow with our comfort.

An uncouth or severe manner of giving reproof, or offering advice, is very justly, and with equal good sense and tenderness, reflected upon by Gonzalo, in the following passage :

My lord Sebastian,
The truth you speak doth lack some gentleness,
And time to speak it in. You rub the fore,
When you fould bring the plaifter.

SCENE II. Trinculo most humourously ridicules the passion of the English for strange sights, in the following reflection, on seeing Caliban lying asleep on the ground, whom he takes for a dead lea-monfter, just cast ashore by the working of the waves.

“ Were I in England, now, as once I was, and had but this filh “ painted, not a holy-day fool there but would give a piece of “ filver. There would this monster maki a mas; any strange beast “ there makes a mar. When they will not give a doit to relieve a “ lame buscar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.”

Antient Dramatic exhibitions, lo called; usually performed by the priests in the !;h and y;th centuries, upca public'theatre, in which the several dis. pensations of the Gifged wire prosanely represented.

Not,

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Not, however, that this foible can fairly be induced against us, as a national reflection, by any means; for it is not peculiar to this, or any other particular people, but will be found to be the common disposition and idle curiosity of mankind, in general. There is another piece of sarcasm, also, thrown out, in the same speech, as unjust as the former : When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar. No nation on the globe is more diftinguished for charity, humanity, and benevolence, than the English are, at present. And this must have been always their characteristic ; for manners may refine, but cannot create, virtues. Polishing may give taste, but feelings come from nature,

After Trinculo has recovered from his fright, and finds Caliban to be but an harmless favage, so very simple as to believe Stephano to be the Man in the Moon; he says,

By this good light, this is a very shallow monster-1 afraid of him a very hallow monster. The man i'th' Moon ? a most poor “ credulous monster.”

'Tis to be observed, here, that he was not charged with having been afraid, nor did any one know of it, but himself; and it was this very consciousness that forced such a bravado from him. This is Doctor Warburton's remark. 'Tis a just one, and may be rendered general, by observing, that, upon all occasions, too prompt a defence of ourselves, is a sort of self-accusation.

ACT III. SCENE I. Ferdinand's first speech, here, prettily expresses that kind of chearfulness with which a person undertakes labour, or executes the meanest or moft irksome offices, for their second-self, for those they love.

There be some sports are painful, but their labour
Delight in them sets off ; some kinds of baseness
Are nobly undergone; and most poor matters

alteration of a syllable, to have it inserted among the Mysteries *. Men would be Chriftians upon their own terms, only, and are too apt to think that faith and fear, without love or works, are sufficient for the

purpose.

А стІІ. SCENE I. Gonzalo, comforting and cheering up the spirits of his companions in the wreck, speaks with a becoming resignation and proper gratitude towards Providence :

Beleech you, Sir, be merry -- you have cause,
So have we all, of joy! for our escape
Is much beyond our loss : our hint of woe
İs common : every day some failor's wife,
The matter or some merchant, and the merchant,
Have just our theme of woe : But for the miracle,
I mean our prelervation, sew in millions
Can speak like us: Tben wiley', soud Sir, weigh
Qur sorrow with our comfort.

An uncouth or severe manner of giving reproof, or offering advice, is very justly, and with equal good sense and tenderness, reflected upon by Gonzalo, in the following passage:

My lord Sebastian,
The truth you speak doth lack some gentleness,
And time to speak it in. You rub the fore,
When you should bring the plaifter.

SCENE II. Trinculo most humourously ridicules the passion of the English for strange lights, in the following reflection, on seeing Caliban lying asleep on the ground, whom he takes for a dead sea-monster, just caft ashore by the working of the waves,

“ Here I in England, now, as once I was, and had but this fish " painted, not a holy-day fool there but would give a piece of • silver. There would this monster make a man; any strange beast " there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a “ lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.”

Antient Dramatic exhibitions, so called; usually performed by the priests in the 1;;h and with centuries, upon public theatres, in which the several dif. pensations of the Gospel were profanely represented.

Not,

Not, however, that this foible can fairly be induced against us, as a national reflection, by any means; for it is not peculiar to this, or any other particular people, but will be found to be the common disposition and idle curiosity of mankind, in general. There is another piece of sarcasm, also, thrown out, in the same speech, as unjust as the former : When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar. No nation on the globe is more diftinguished for charity, humanity, and benevolence, than the English are, at present. And this must have been always their characteristic ; for manners may refine, but cannot create, virtues, Polishing may give taite, but feelings come from nature,

After Trinculo has recovered from his fright, and finds Caliban to be but an harmless favage, so very simple as to believe Stephano to be the Man in the Moon; he says,

“ By this good light, this is a very shallow monster-1 afraid of him a very shallow monster. The man i'th' Moon ? a most poor w celulous monster."

'Tis to be observed, here, that he was not charged with having been afraid, nor did any one know of it, but himself; and it was this very consciousnefs that forced such a bravado from him. This is Doctor Warburton's remark. 'Tis a just one, and may be rendered general, by observing, that, upon all occasions, too prompt a defence of ourselves, is a sort of self-accusation.

ACT III. SCENE I. Ferdinand's first speech, here, prettily expresses that kind of chearfulness with which a person undertakes labour, or executes the meanest or most irksome offices, for their second-felf, for those they love.

There be some sports are painful, but their labour
Delight in them sets off; fome kinds of baseness
Are nobly undergone; and most poor matters

Point to rich ends. This my mean task would be
As heavy to me, as 'tis odious; but
The mistress which I serve, quickens what's dead,
And niakes my labour pleasure.-My sweet mistress
Weeps when she sees me work, and says, such baseness
Had ne'er like executer. I forget
But those sweet thoughts do even refresh my labour,
Most busy-less, when I do it.

The above speech has something of the same turn and spirit in it, with that of Prospero, in the second Scene of the First Act, already observed upon.

SCENE IV. The horrors and upbraidings of a wounded conscience, are finely painted in the latter part of this scene : Alonzo. O! it is monstrous! monstrous !

Methought the billows spoke, and told me of it ;
The winds did fing it to me; and the thunder,
That deep and dreadful organ-pipe, pronounced

The name of Prosper. It did bass my trespass.
Gonzalo. All three of them are desperate ; their great guilt,

Like poison given to work a great time after,
Now 'gins to bite the spirits.

A CT IV. S C Ε Ν Ε Ι. A chaste conduct between betrothed lovers, is strongly urged, and fanctified, by severe maledictions, and very natural predictions, in the following passages :

Prospero, giving his daug bter to Ferdinand.
Then as my gift, and thine own acquisition,
Worthily purchased, take my daughter. But
If thou doit break her virgin knot, before
All fanctimonious ceremonies may
With full and holy rite be ministered,
No sweet aspersions shall the heavens let fall
To make this contract grow: but barren hate,
Sour-eyed disdain, and discord, shall beftrew
The union of your bed with weeds so loathly,
That
you

shall hate it both. Therefore take heed,
As Hymen's lamps shall light you –
Ferdinand's reply.

As I hope
For quiet days, fair issue, and long life,

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