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LONDON:
JOHN SNOW, 35, PATERNOSTER ROW.

MAY BE HAD OF ALL BOOKSELLERS.

Price Threepence.

J. UNWIN, GRESHAM STEAM PRESS, BUCKLERSBURY, LONDON.

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305

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Biblical Illustration.

Statistics.

Sea of Galilee ..................................

304

Diminution of the Population of the Sand-

Cana of Galilee ..........

wich Islands

Drunkenness

Biography.

American Slavery ...........

State and Prospects of Greece ...............

Rev. J. Berridge.

305

Mr. Joseph Sturge ....

311

Death of Dr. Morison....

311

Literary Notices.

Lessons from Jesus...........

Lessons by the Way.

Titles of Our Lord, adopted by Himself

Luther's Prayer for Melancthon .........

in the New Testament ............

312

The “Precious Blood of Christ”

312

The Beginnings of Divine Grace.............

The World's Only Hope .........

The Heavens and the Earth.

313

A Lively Emblem of Heaven

Hid Treasures, and the Search for them ..

Blind Bartimeus, and his Great Physician 33

The Saint and the Cobbler

313

Death from Want of Sleep .........

The Congregational Pulpit ............

313

Frank Elliott; or, Wells in the Desert ... 33

Fine Thoughts ....

313

A Slander Refuted ...........

Lectures, Expository and Practical, on

314

the Book of Esther......

Closet Devotional Exercises for the

Ecclesiastical Affairs.

Young; from Ten Years old and up-

wards .........

Analysis of the Church of England......... 314 Memoir of Elizabeth George ..............

“Surprise Parties”.

314

Modern Anglican Theology .................

The Poetical Works of Spenser

The Lay Preachers' Corner. The English Bible .....

Bible History, in connection with the

Rey. H. W. Beecher

............ 315 General History of the World ..........

Midnight Musings, and other Poems ......

The Psalter; or, Psalms of David .........

ថាននៅgs.

The Book of Psalms, according to the

Ministers' Families the Salt of the Land... 317

Authorised Version .......

333

Ministers' Sons and Daughters ............ 317

The Book of Revelation .............

Bible Psalmody

333

Bible Training

333

Extracts from New Works.

The Life of Joh

333

Scripture Lessons .....................

333

Eloquence of the Pulpit and of the Bar ... 319

On True Religion .......

The Lawfulness of Bearing Arms in De-

Illustrative Teaching......

fensive Warfare .........

......... 3

A Short and Plain Instruction and Prepa-

Directions concerning Prayer and Prayer

ration for the better understanding of

Meetings ........,

320

the Lord's Supper ...........

333

A Serious Accident.....

321

Twilight Hours ......

333

Labours at Cronstadt .......

322

A Simple Interpretion of the Revelation .. 333

Perils of Bible Agency .......

322

Persecution of Gossner

Pleading with God

323

Correspondence.

Intelligence.

Aspects, Social and Religious, of Germany 323 | Irish Missions .......
Church Membership .....

.. 325 | Congregational Record ...........

...........

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Theology.

PUBLIC LIBRARY

277104

ASTOR, LFNT AND REVIVALS OF RELIGION. TILDEN FOUNLOD:

R 1903 L The necessity and importance of a revival of religion have of late occupied a considerable portion of public attention. This has been occasioned not so much by indications of a declension of religion in this country compared with its state in former periods, as by reports from America of the extraordinary measure of Divine influence, which, in many parts of that interesting country, has attended the work of God. Considering the highly respectable quarters whence these reports have proceeded, no reasonable doubt can be entertained of their substantial correctness. In many districts and congregations in the northern part of that vast continent, a general and powerful impression of the infinite importance of religion has been produced, where formerly only a cold and barren profession of the Gospel existed ; and multitudes, young and old, rich and poor, of every class and profession, have been led to receive the Word of God. This delightful effect has been produced in general by no extraordinary measures or efforts, but by the silent and efficient influence of the Spirit of God, in connexion with the diligent and faithful use of divinely appointed means. It has been attended by no extravagant manifestations of excited or impassioned feeling, but by the better evidence of a real change-the fruits of holy conversation and sanctified life.

Without adverting more particularly to Transatlantic circumstances, I may be allowed to say, that the state of religion in our own souls, among our Christian connexions, or in the country to which we belong, is a subject peculiarly appropriate for consideration at the commencement of a year. At such a time we are naturally led to review the past, to look round on the present, and to anticipate the future. Some are, perhaps, engaged in pensive musings, and in reference both to temporal and to spiritual things are, perhaps, disposed to exclaim, “O that it were with me as in days that are past, when the candle of the Lord shone brightly upon me !" Others, perhaps, are exulting in the abundance of their enjoyments, and contrasting with delight their present circumstances, with scenes of desolation and sadness, which, they trust, have passed away for eyer. Some are looking forward to the future with wishful anticipations of coming joy; and others are, perhaps, dreading it as big only with the promise of suffering and calamity. The past, with respect to usefulness, but not to account, is gone for ever. The present only is ours; we know not what a day may bring forth. Whatsoever our hands, then, find to do, let us do with all our might.

A revival of religion supposes either that religion has fallen into decay, or that it has not reached that vigour and elevation to which it might be expected to arrive. In both senses it is a phrase of a comparative nature. It also implies that there is some standard or period with which we are disposed to compare “ the present line of things.” And, therefore, before we can speak intelligibly upon the subject, we must have a correct idea of the standard by which the nature and degree of religious feeling and attainment should be tried. Without this, everything must be vague and indefinite. Instruction will be unsatisfactory, reproof and admonition adininistered at random, and exhortation and excitement, however well intended, either miss their aim, or produce only general impressions, indefinite in their nature, and temporary in their duration,

VOL. XVI.

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