Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volumen81

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W. Blackwood, 1857

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Página 266 - Whatever is fitted in any sort to excite the ideas of pain and danger, that is to say, whatever is in any sort terrible, or is conversant about terrible objects, or operates in a manner analogous to terror, is a source of the sublime; that is, it is productive of the strongest emotion which the mind is capable of feeling.
Página 273 - Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge ; it is the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all Science.
Página 273 - For books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
Página 518 - Thou hast had pity on the gourd, for the which thou hast not laboured, neither madest it grow; which came up in a night, and perished in a night: and should not I spare Nineveh, that great city, wherein are more than sixscore thousand persons that cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand; and also much cattle?
Página 269 - The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave his voice ; hail-stones and coals of fire.
Página 232 - And, generally, men ought to find the difference between saltness and bitterness. Certainly, he that hath a satirical vein, as he maketh others afraid of his wit, so he had need be afraid of others
Página 273 - ... teeth : and being sown up and down, may chance to spring up armed men. And yet, on the other hand, unless wariness be used, as good almost kill a man as kill a good book : who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image ; but he who destroys a good book kills reason itself — kills the image of God, as it were, in the eye.
Página 364 - The triumph and the vanity, The rapture of the strife — The earthquake voice of Victory, To thee the breath of life...
Página 88 - As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk, the cat began to kill the rat ; the rat began to gnaw the rope ; the rope began to hang the butcher ; the butcher began to kill the ox ; the ox began to drink the water ; the water began to quench the fire ; the fire began to burn the stick ; the stick began to beat the dog ; the dog began to bite the pig; the little pig in a fright jumped over the stile ; and so the old woman got home that night.
Página 159 - The lady seemed to have made a conquest of him at the very outset," said Mr Ely. " I was immensely amused one night at Granby's, when he was telling us her story about her husband's adventures. He said, ' When she told me the tale, I felt I don't know how, — I felt it from the crown of my head to the sole of my feet.

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