Poetic treasures: or, Passages from the poets

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Ward, Lock & Company, 1881 - 644 páginas
 

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Contenido

Charity
23
Envy
24
ROBERT SOUTHWELL 15501595
25
Vicissitude
26
Content and Rich
27
JOSHUA SILVESTER 15631618
28
FULK GREVILLE LORD BROOKE 15541628
29
SIR JOHN DAVIES 1570_1626 The Soul XXII WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 15641616
30
Duke and Lord
31
Henry V and Lord Chief Justice
33
Night
37
Full Fathom
38
Queen
40
The Apothecary
41
Hotspurs description of a
45
Clarence and Brackenbury
45
Scroop and Richard
47
Henry IVs Soliloquy on Sleep 16 Henry IV and Prince Henry 17 Henry V to his Soldiers
50
Wolsey and Cromwell
52
Lear
55
Macbeths Soliloquy 21 Antonys Funeral Oration over Cæsars Body
56
Hamlets Soliloquy on his Mothers Marriago 23 Hamlets Soliloquy on Death
59
Soliloquy of the King in Hamlet
60
QUEEN ELIZABETH 15331602
77
Song
83
FRANCIS DAVISON 15751618
94
ANONYMOUS author of The Old and
101
PHILIP MASSINGER 15851639
107
The Prisoner
118
JAMES SHIRLEY 15941666
125
HENRY NEBLE 17981828
139
The Grasshopper
153
SIR JOHN DENHAM 16151668
167
Picture of a lady in a prospect of Flowers
171
Fortitude
179
OTWAY 16511685
187
_ANONYMOUS Author of The Lovedistraught
193
XCIIIMATTHEW PRIOR 16641721
199
WILLIAM WALSH 16_1708
205
Vicissitude
212
JOSEPH ADDISON 16721719
218
JOHN HUGHES 16771720
225
OXXII DR EDWARD YOUNG 16811765
232
JOHN GAY 16881732
238
WILLIAM BROOME 16881745
261
GEORGE LILLO 16931739
267
REV CHRISTOPHER PITT 1699_1
273
OXLVIII THOMAS Moss 17_1769
283
DR BENJAMIN STILLINGFLEET 17021771
291
GILBERT WEST 17061756
297
OLXXII GEORGE LORD LYTTLETON 17091773
305
OLXXVIII WILLIAM SHENSTONE 17141763
313
OLXXXIV RICHARD LAGO 17151781
319
OLXXXVI RICHARD WEST 17161742
328
Apollo Silenus c
337
OXCVIII DR JAMES GRAINGER 17211766
343

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 133 - Thus with the year Seasons return, but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of ev'n or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine; But cloud instead, and ever-during dark Surrounds me, from the cheerful ways of men Cut off, and for the book of Knowledge fair Presented with a universal blank Of Nature's works, to me expunged and rased, And wisdom at one entrance quite shut out.
Página 529 - Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note, As his corse to the rampart we hurried ; Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot O'er the grave where our hero we buried. We buried him darkly at dead of night, The sods with our bayonets turning ; By the struggling moonbeam's misty light And the lantern dimly burning.
Página 161 - GOING TO THE WARS Tell me not, Sweet, I am unkind That from the nunnery Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind, To war and arms I fly. True, a new mistress now I chase, The first foe in the field; And with a stronger faith embrace A sword, a horse, a shield. Yet this inconstancy is such As you too shall adore; I could not love thee, dear, so much, Loved I not honour more.
Página 45 - This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered, — We few, we happy few, we band of brothers...
Página 83 - Drink to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine; Or leave a kiss but in the cup And I'll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise Doth ask a drink divine; But might I of Jove's nectar sup, I would not change for thine.
Página 48 - Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell. O, what a fall was there, my countrymen! Then I, and you, and all of us fell down, Whilst bloody treason flourish'd over us. O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops.
Página 122 - Where the great Sun begins his state Robed in flames and amber light, The clouds in thousand liveries dight ; While the ploughman, near at hand, Whistles o'er the furrow'd land, And the milkmaid singeth blithe, And the mower whets his scythe, And every shepherd tells his tale Under the hawthorn in the dale.
Página 118 - Go, lovely Rose ! Tell her that wastes her time and me, That now she knows, When I resemble her to thee, How sweet and fair she seems to be. Tell her that's young, And shuns to have her graces spied, That had'st thou sprung In deserts where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired : Bid her come forth, Suffer herself to be desired, And not blush so to be admired. Then die ! that she The common fate of all things rare May read in thee, —...
Página 481 - On Linden, when the sun was low, All bloodless lay the untrodden snow ; And dark as winter was the flow Of Iser, rolling rapidly. But Linden saw another sight, When the drum beat at dead of night, Commanding fires of death to light The darkness of her scenery. By torch and trumpet fast arrayed, Each horseman drew his battle-blade ; And furious every charger neighed To join the dreadful revelry.
Página 22 - Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten: In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love.

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