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cuniary claims, 328–329, 331, 184-185; alliance with Great
390, 391, 392; North Atlantic Britain, 192-195; absorption
fisheries, 146; Art. I, treaty of of Korea, 195.

Guadalupe-Hidalgo, 230. Java, visited by Edmund Rob-
International Commission of Jur- erts, 175.
ists, 390.

Jay, John, Secretary of Foreign
International law, principle of Affairs, xii; member of “Com-
equality of nations, 197.

mittee on Secret Correspon-
Interoceanic canal, neutralization dence," 6; mission to Spain,

and Clayton-Bulwer treaty, 14,16,18; peace commissioner,
122-125; demand for American 27 – 29;

attitude towards
control, 125; Hay-Pauncefote France, 29, 30; treaty of 1794,
treaties, 126; tolls question, 56, 308; treaties signed by, 33.
128-130; instructions to dele- Jay treaty, French resentment,

gates to Panama Congress, 373. 56, 57; amendments by Sen-
Intervention, policy, 13, 1977 ate, 165, 166; arbitrations,

advocated by Kossuth, 202; 308-313.
Cuba, 205-208; Mexico, 216 Jeffers, Lieutenant, case of the
et seq.; Nicaragua, 400; Haiti, Water Witch, 133, 134.

402; Santo Domingo, 404. Jefferson, Thomas, Secretary of
Ishii, Viscount, agreement as State, xii, xiii; injunction
to China, 184-185.

against intermeddling in Eu-
Itajuba, Viscount, arbitrator at ropean affairs, ix; declines
Geneva, 316.

mission to France, 8; attitude
Italy, position on expatriation, towards Barbary powers, 105,

292; Venezuelan blockade, 253. 107-110; position as to Genêt,
Izard, Ralph, mission to Tus- 40, 44; exposition of neutral
cany, 14, 19.

duties, 45; doctrine of recog-

nition, 209; policy of non-
JACKSON, ANDREW, 169, 170; intervention, 199; position as

appointment of Edmund Rob- to Cuba and Mexico, 259, 361;
erts, 174; attempts to acquire as to Louisiana and Floridas,
Texas, 349; recognition of 342; impressment, 113, 114;
Dom Miguel, 210.

expatriation, 274; Monroe Doc-
Jackson, F. J., British minister, trine, 242; signer of treaties,

33; etiquette, inattention to
Japan, opening to trade, 186-190; formalities, 427; talks with

Shimonoseki indemnity, 433; Brazilian students in France,
tariff duties, 433; peace of 389.
Portsmouth, 438; disinclined Joint high commission of 1871,
to exempt private property at
sea from capture, 63; protec-Joseph II. of Austria on Ameri-
tion of fur-seals and sea-otters, can independence, 421.
155; war with Russia, 181;
treaty of peace, 181-182; im- KENT, JAmes, on expatriation,
migration question in United

273, 274, 286.
States, 191; California land Knox, General, views as to re-
legislation, 191-192; agreement ception of Genêt, 39.
with United States as to China, Knox, Philander C., Secretary

428.

316.

of State, xv; note on canal | Lind, John, special agent to
tolls question, 129; six-power Mexico, 218; failure of mission,
Chinese loan, 183; notice of 219, 220, 223.
withdrawal of recognition from Livingston, Edward, Secretary of
Zelaya, 265; loan convention State, xiii.
with Honduras, 267; Central Livingston, Robert R., Secretary
American tour, 267.

of Foreign Affairs, xii, 5 n.;
Korea, opening to trade, 190; Louisiana purchase, 342–346.

subject of dispute between Loubet, President, award' of
Japan and Russia, 181; Anglo- Corn Islands to Colombia, 402.
Japanese alliance, 192–195; Loughborough, Lord Chancellor,
treaty with United States, 195; opinion on treaty question,
timber concessions and Russo- 312.
Japanese war, 195; absorption Louis XVI. of France, counselled
by Japan, 196; acquiescence of by Gouverneur Morris, 38;
United States, 196.

treaties, 40.
Kossuth, Louis, visit to United Louisiana purchase, 341-347.
States, 202–205.

Loyalists' claims for compensa-
Koszta, Martin, seizure at Smyr- tion, 27, 28, 136.
na, 300.

Lusitania, use of American colors,

68; sinking, 70-71, 72.
LAMMASCH, Dr. H., northeastern
fisheries arbitrator, 146.

MACDONALD, Sir John A., mem-
Lansing, Robert, proposal as to ber of joint high commission of

armed merchantmen, 73; Ishii 1871, 316.
agreement as to China, 184- Macdonald, Thomas, arbitrator
185; reply to Carranza pro- under Jay treaty, 309.
test, 234; on the Monroe Doc McClellan, Captain George B.,
trine, 268.

report on Samana Bay, 362.
Laurens, Henry, mission to the McFarland, Mr., captured on the

Netherlands, 15, 16; capture Trent, 114.
and imprisonment, 16; peace McKinley, William, demands

,
signer, 27, 29.

restoration of order in Cuba,
Laybach, Congress of, 238.

207; advocates immunity of
Leagues for Peace, 441-445. private property at sca, 61;
Lee, Arthur, mission to Prussia, statement concerning expatria-
15; theft of his papers at Ber-

tion, 293:
lin,
19-23.

McLean, Louis, Secretary of
Lee, William, mission to Vienna, State, xiii.

14, 15, 19; plan of treaty with Madero, Francisco, revolution in
the Netherlands, 17.

Mexico, 215; becomes Presi-
Lewis and Clark, expedition of, dent, 216; overthrow and
351.

death, 216–217.
Liberia, recognition of, 422; ad- Madison, James, Secretary of

justment of questions with State, xiii; war message of
France, Germany and Great 1812, 114, 275; importance of
Britain, 439.

the Mississippi, 341; instruc-
Li Hung-Chang, treaty between tions as to New Orleans and
United States and Korea, 195. the Floridas, 344; the Monroe

207, 208.

Doctrine, 242; simplicity of Mediation, distinguished from ar-
manners, 428.

bitration, 306, 307; Hague con-
Mails, interference with at sea, 80. vention, 326.
Maine, destruction at Havana, Mediterranean, early trade, 104,

105.
Malvinas Islands. See Falkland Mercury, captured by the Brit-
Islands.

ish, 16.
Manchuria, subject of dispute Merry, Mr., British minister, 428.

between Japan and Russia, Mexico, Gulf of, islands in, 13.

181-182; railways, 183. Mexico, views of Jefferson, 259;
Manila, visited by Edmund Rob- alleged designs on Cuba, 374;

erts, 175; captured by Ameri- war of 1846, 351; recognition
can forces, 354.

of Diaz, 212-213; revolution
Mann, A. Dudley, agent to Hun- of 1911, 215-216; refusal to
gary, 202.

recognize Huerta, 213-225;
Marcy, William L., Secretary of A B C mediation, 225; con-

State, xiv; treaty as to reci- vention at Aguascalientes,
procity and fisheries, 141; ex- 225; recognition of Carranza,
tradition treaties, 424; case 227; Columbus, N. M., raid,
of Martin Koszta, 300; at- 227; occupation of Mexican
tempt to annex Hawaii, 353; territory, 229, 234-237; joint
views on expatriation, 277; commission, and withdrawal of
advocates immunity of private American forces, 237; arbitra-
property at sea, 61; circular

tions, 351.
as to diplomatic dress, 430; Midway Islands. See Brooks or
declines to recommend ap- Midway Islands.

pointment of ambassadors, 435. Miguel, Dom, recognition by
Mare clausum, doctrine of, 151, United States, 210.
152.

Milan decree, 57, 60.
Maria, American schooner cap- Military area, declared by Great

tured by Algerine cruiser, 106. Britain, 66. See War Zone.
Maritime law, controversy as to “Millions for defence, but not a
armed merchantmen, 73–74;

cent for tribute," 59.
exemption of private property Mines, use of, in the sea, 66
from capture, 61-65.

68.
Marshall, John, Secretary of Mississippi River, navigation of,

State, xiii; envoy to France, 138, 341, 343.
57-59; views as to effect of Mole St. Nicolas, attempt to
naturalization, 275; principle annex, 364.
of equality of nations, 198. Monopolies, commercial and co-
Mason, James M., capture on the lonial, 2–4, 159, 166, 167.
Trent, 114.

Monroe Doctrine, X-XI, 7;
Mason, John Y., diplomatic Holy Alliance, 238; European
dress, 431.

congresses, 238, 239; Canning-
Massachusetts, legislative reso- Rush correspondence, 240;

lution in favor of arbitration, Monroe's message of 1823, 243-
323.

246; instructions to delegates to
Mayo, Rear-Admiral, Tampico Panama Congress, 373; Presi-
incident, 223.

dent Polk's message of 1845,

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neu-

245, 246; Mr. Seward's posi- Nationality. See Expatriation.
tion, 257; Venezuelan boundary, Natural rights, theory of, 4, 270,
246-251; exposition by Presi- 420.
dent Roosevelt, 251; accep- Naturalization, effect of, 275,
tance by Germany and Great 276, 293, 294; treaties, 290,
Britain, 252, 253; Venezuelan 291; conditions under act of
blockade, 253-255; pecuniary. June 29, 1906, 296; declara-
claims, 256; "Drago doctrine, tion of intention, 298–301; re-
258–259; Hague declarations, nunciation of naturalization,
261, 439; Santo Domingo, 261; 297.
Nicaragua, 265; Honduras, Navigation, boundary waters,
267; Mr. Knox's declarations,

146.
267; addresses of President Navigation Acts, 32, 161.
Wilson and Mr. Lansing, 268; Navy, early need of, 107.
Latin-American interpretation, Nelson, Samuel, member of joint
414, 415; particular phrases, high commission of 1871, 316.
258; popular distortions, 416- | Netherlands, mission of Laurens,
418.

15, 16; treaties, 14, 17, 33;
Monroe, James, minister to war with England, 17; award

France, 49, 57; Louisiana pur- of King on Northeastern boun-
chase, 344-346; negotiations dary, 314.
with England, 167; Secretary Neutral rights, struggle for, 53,
of State, President, xiii; policy 308, 310-313; armed
of non-intervention, 231; Mon- trality, 54, 55; rule of war of
roe Doctrine, 238 et seq.

See 1756, 59; continuous voy-
Monroe Doctrine.

ages,” 60; Berlin and Milan
Morgan, John T., Bering Sea decrees, 60; orders in council,
arbitrator, 319.

60; blockade, 53, 54, 69, 78-
Morocco, early relations with, 79; contraband, 54, 66; vio-

104, 106; system of protec- lations by France, 55, 57, 59-
tion, 434; attitude of United 61; by Great Britain, 56, 59-
States, 440.

61, 66, 67, 69, 77–81, 86, 91-92;
Morris, Gouverneur, agent to by Germany, 67–72, 74-77,

London, 163, 164; minister 88, 94; armed merchantmen,

to France, 37, 38, 47, 49. 73-74; mines, 66, 68; sub-
Morris, Robert , member of marines, 67, 68, 69, 72, 74-

Committee of Secret Corre- 77, 88, 92-94, 94-96, 96-98,
spondence," 6.

99-101; immunity of private
Most-favored-nation clause, 12, property at sea, 61, 102; free-
373.

dom of navigation, 103; "free
Muscat, treaty with, 1833, 175. ships free goods,” 54.

Neutrality, system of, 33, 35;
NAPLES, popular movement in, proclamation of 1794, 39-42:44;
239.

duties, 45-46, 310-313; legisla-
Napoleon, cession of Louisiana, tion, 49; Alabama claims, 49,

343, 345; Berlin and Milan de 50; due diligence, 50; proc.
crees, 57, 60.

lamation of 1914, 66;
National Convention of France, troversies with Germany and
provision decree, 55.

Great Britain, 67-94, 90-98.

con-

See Armed neutrality; Neutral | Page, Lieutenant, exploring ex-
rights.

pedition, 132, 133.
Neutralization of ways of com- Pago-Pago, Bay of, in Samoa,
munication, 122.

355, 357:
New Orleans, right of deposit, Palmer, Sir Roundell, opinion
343.

on Alabama case, 52. See also
Nicaragua, arbitrations, 322; Selborne, Lord.

Rivas - Walker government, Panama, Republic of, recogni-
210-211; interoceanic canal tion, 210, 238; canal treaty,
route, 123, 127, 401; inter- 127; special position in Pan
vention, xi; fall of Zelaya, Americanism, 400.
265; landing of marines, 267; Panama Congress, 369-378.
concessions to United States, Pan-American conference. See
401; special position in Pan International American Con-
Americanism, 400.

ference.
Nicholl, Sir John, arbitrator Pan-American Financial Con-
under Jay treaty, 311.

ference, 392–397.
Non-intercourse, 61.

Pan-American Union. See Bu-
Non-intervention, policy of, viii, reau of American Republics.

197-205, 208; instructions to Pan Americanism, x; countries
delegates to Panama Congress, comprehended, 365; revolt
375; views of United States against colonial system, 365-
Congress, 376; intervention 366; Bolivar's “prophetic let.
in Mexico 218 et seq.; Nicara- ter," 367; Henry Clay, 367,
gua, 400; Haiti, 402; Santo 368; mission of Rodney, Gra-
Domingo, 404.

ham, and Bland, 367–368;
Northcote, Sir Stafford, mem- recognition of independence,

ber of joint high commission 368; Monroe Doctrine, 368;
of 1871, 316.

Panama Congress, 369-378;
Northeastern boundary, 314. Falkland Islands question, 379;

Mexican war, 379; Lima Con-
OLNEY, RICHARD, Secretary of gress (1847), 380; Conti-

State, xv; exposition of Mon- nental Treaty' (1856), 381;
roe Doctrine, 247-250; gen-

Walker and other filibusters,
eral arbitration treaty, 325. 381; conditions in Mexico
“Open door" policy, 179.

(1858–1861), 382; Civil War
Orders in council, British, 56, 60, in United States, 383; Spanish
69, 78, 80, 86, 92.

peace conference (1870), 384;
Oregon, boundary settlement, War of the Pacific, 385; in-
350-352.

vitation by Colombia to con-
O'Sullivan, John L., minister to ference at Panama, 386; in-
Portugal, 431.

vitation by Blaine for peace
Oswald, Richard, peace negotia- congress at Washington, 386;
tion, 26, 27, 29.

International American Con-
Ottoman Empire, trade with, ference, 386–389; Second Con-
173; expatriation, 293.

ference, 390; Third, 390-392;

Fourth, 392; International
Pacific OCEAN, meaning of term, Commission of Jurists, 390;
148, 153.

Pan-American Financial Con-

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