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Declaration of Independence, 2, | Dumba, Dr., Austrian ambassa-
6, 270, 420, 422, 423.

dor, dismissal, 82.
Declaration of intention. See Dupuy de Lôme, Señor, Spanish
Naturalization.

minister, his withdrawal, 207.
Declaration of London, 66–67, Duties, discriminating. See Dis-
68.

criminating duties.
Declaration of Paris, 61, 64.
Democratic National Conven- EATON, GENERAL WILLIAM, cap-

tion, 1916, declaration concern- ture of Derne, 110.
ing Mexico, 233.

Ecuador, arbitrations with, 322.
Denmark, abolition of sound Elgin, Lord, reciprocity and fish-

dues, 121-122; claim to mo- eries treaty, 141, 142..
nopolize fisheries, 135; question Elliot, Hugh, British minister at
of ceding West India posses- Berlin, theft of Arthur Lee's

sions, 359; arbitrations, 322. papers, 19-23.
Department of Foreign Affairs," Embargoes, 61.
xii, 5 n.

Emory, Frederic, development of
Diaz, Felix, revolt in Mexico, consular reports, 426.
216.

Empress of China, American ship,
Diaz, Porfirio, recognition by arrival at Canton 1784, 173.

United States, 212–213; final England. See Great Britain.
overthrow, 215.

Etiquette, diplomatic, contro-
Dickinson, John, member of

versies as to, 427-433.
“Committee of Secret Corre- European powers, attitude tow-
spondence," 6.

ards American Revolution,
Diplomacy, American. See Amer- 17-19.
ican diplomacy.

European system, abstention
Diplomacy, element of chance, from participation in, viii.

25; questionable practices, 19. Eustis, William, captured on the
Diplomatic dress, controversies

Trent, 114
concerning, 429-433.

Evarts, William M., Secretary of
Diplomatic life, 15.

State, xiv; counsel at Geneva,
Directory, French, refusal to re- 316; establishment of consular
ceive Pinckney, 57-59,

reports, 426.
Discriminating duties, abolition Everett, A. H., empowered to
of, 12, 171-173.

negotiate with Japan, 186.
Divine right, principle of, 4. Everett, Edward, Secretary of
Dogger Bank incident, 327. State, xiv; views on expatria-
“Dollar Diplomacy," 267.

tion, 277.
Dolphin, U.S.S., Tampico inci-Solis territorial, of the

,
dent, 223.

United States, 13, 339-364;
Dominican republic. See Santo Alaska, 352; California and
Domingo.

New Mexico, 351; Floridas,
Dress, diplomatic. See Diplo- 348; Texas, 347, 348; Louisi-
matic dress.

ana, 341-347; Oregon, 350;
Due diligence," test of neutral Mesilla Valley, 352; Hawaii,
duty, 50.

353; Philippines and Porto
Dumas, Č. W. F., his services to Rico, 354, 355; Tutuila, 355,
the United States, 21-25. 356, 357; Panama Canal Zone,

66

357–358; Cuban harbors, 358; tion in Cuba, 206; advocates
Corn Islands, 358; naval base immunity of private property
on Gulf of Fonseca, 358; Dan. at sea, 61; president of peace
ish West Indies, 359; Horse- conference (1870), 384.
Shoe Reef, 359; Brooks or Fisheries, northeastern, 27, 28,
Midway Islands, 360; Wake 30; treaty of 1782-83, 136-138;
Island, 360; Guano Islands, negotiations at Ghent, 138;
360; Culebra and Culebrita, seizures of vessels,

139;
363; Unsuccessful attempts, “rights" and "liberties," 137-
360–364; Canada, 360; Sal- 141; convention of 1818, 140,
vador, 360; Cuba, 361; Yuca- 141; legislation and disputes,
tan, 362; Santo Domingo, and 141; reciprocity treaty of 1854,
Samana Bay, 362-363; Môle 141, 142; treaty of 1871, 142;
St. Nicolas, 364.

Halifax commission, 142, 143:
Expatriation, doctrine of, 270; modus vivendi of 1885, 143;
meaning of, 271, 293, 294,

headland theory, 141, 143;
299-300; attitude of courts, meaning of “bays," 141, 143,
273; of Secretaries of State, 144; act of March 3, 1887, 144;
274; Buchanan's innovation, modus vivendi, 145; arbitration
276, 277, 283, 284; views of at The Hague, 146; Bayard-
Webster, Everett, and Mariy, Chamberlain treaty, 144, 147,
277; Cushing's opinion, 278; 149; award of Hague Court,
case of Christian Ernst, 281- 320.
284; Black's opinion, 281, 295; Fisheries, propagation of food.
Seward's action, 285; case of fishes in contiguous waters,
Warren and Costello, 286; 146.
agitation for legislation, 287; Fisheries questions, 135-158.
act of July 27, 1868, 288-290; Flag, misuse of, 67, 68.
treaties, 290, 291; subsequent Fletcher, Rear-Admiral, occupa-
action, 294-300; naturalization

tion of Vera Cruz, 223.
act of June 29, 1906, 296; ex- Florida, Confederate cruiser, 50.
patriation act of March 2, Floridas, acquisition, 260, 341-
1907, 297; married women, 348.
298; declarants' passports, 298; Fonseca, Gulf of, protest by
Koszta case, 300.

Costa Rica, Honduras, and Sal
Extradition, practice of, 424. vador, against grant of naval

station by Nicaragua to United
FALKLAND ISLANDS, occupation States, 401-402.
by Great Britain, 379.

Foodstuffs. See Provisions.
Far East, trade with, 173; Anglo- Foreign affairs, committee for,

Japanese alliance, 192-195. 5 n.; department of, 5 *.;
Ferdinand VII. of Spain, restora. secretary of, 5 n.
tion by France, 240.

Foreign Policy, local influences,
“Fifty-four forty or fight," 351. vii.
Fillmore, Millard, reception of Forsyth, John, Secretary of State,

Kossuth, 204.
Fish, Hamilton, Secretary of Foster, John W., Secretary of

State, xiv; treaty of May 8, State, xv; agent in Bering
1871, 316; opposes interven-1 Sea Arbitration, 319.

xiii.

Fox, Charles James, 26.

of State, xv; views as to am-
France, secret mission of Deane, bassadorial rank, 435.

5, 6; proposed treaty, 6, 7; French consuls, assumption of
obligations to, 7; attitude admiralty powers, 44, 45.
towards American Revolution, French Revolution, attitude of
7, 9; treaties of commerce and United States, 35, 36, 209;
alliance, 12-14, 33, 198, 202; course of Gouverneur Morris,
proposal of new alliance, 43,

37, 38.
199; question as to effect of Funston, General, occupation of
alliance, 42–44; violations of Vera Cruz, 225; negotiations
neutrality, 39-42, 56, 59-61; in Mexico, 229.
recall of Genêt, Morris, and Fur-seal arbitration. See Bering
Monroe, 47-49, 57; refusal to

Sea Controversy.
receive Pinckney, 57; X. Y. Z. Fur-seals, protection. See Bering
negotiations, 57-59; rupture

Sea Controversy.
of relations, 59; reacquisition
of Louisiana, 341; opposition GALLATIN, ALBERT, effort to
to claim of visit and search, abolish commercial restrictions,
116; invasion of Spain, 239; 167, 170.
indisposed to exempt private Gamboa, F., on Lind mission to
property at sea from capture, Mexico, 220.
63; Anglo-Japanese alliance, Genêt, Edmond C., French minis-
192–195; position on expatria- ter to United States, 38-41, 43,
tion, 292; arbitrations, 321, 44; recall, 44, 48.
322.

Geneva arbitration, 313, 316, 317.
Franklin, Benjamin, member of Geneva convention, 434.

Committee of Secret Corre- George III. advised to recognize
spondence,”_6; solicits aid of American independence, 25.
C. W. F. Dumas, 24; com- Germany, acceptance of Monroe
missioner to France, 8; voy- Doctrine, 252, 261; Venezue-
age to France, 15; correspon- lan blockade, 253-255; Samoan
dence with Shelburne, 25, 26; policy, 356; violations of neu-
proposals for peace, 27; op- tral rights, 67–72, 74-77, 88,
position to claims of loyalists, 94; rupture of relations, 89;
28; position as to confiscated proposed arrangement with
debts, 28; attitude towards Japan and Mexico, 91; effect
France, 29-31; commissioned of war-zone decrees, 94; rup-
to treat with Barbary powers,

ture with Brazil, 99-101.
105; negotiator of treaties, 33; Gerry, Elbridge, envoy to France,
advocates immunity of private 57-59.
property at sea, 61, 372; dip- Ghent, treaty of, stipulation
iomatic dress, 430.

against slave-trade, 118; ar-
Frederick the Great, 21.

bitrations, 314.
Freedom, principle of, 2, 6. Gibraltar, Strait of, navigation,
Free port acts, 167.

104, 105, III, 112.
“Free ships free goods,' 54; Glenn Springs, raid, 229.

instructions to delegates to Glynn, Commander, visit to
Panama Congress, 372.

Japan, 186.
Frelinghuysen, F. T., Secretary Good offices, Hague treaty, 326.

CO, 226.

Gore, Christopher, arbitrator un-| Grey and Ripon, Earl de, mem-
der Jay treaty, 310.

ber of joint high commission
Government, acts of, 4.

of 1871, 316.
Graham, John, commissioner to Grotius, principle of equality of
South America, 367.

nations, 197; classification of
Gram, Gregers, Bering Sea ar- contraband, 54.
bitrator, 319.

Guadalupe, Plan of, 217.
Grant, U. Š., attitude towards Guadalupe-Hidalgo, treaty of,

Cuba, 206; attempts to annex 230, 351.
Santo Domingo, 363.

Guano Islands, 360.
Gray, Captain Robert, discovery Guantanamo, 358.

of Columbia River, 350. Gutierrez, General, proclaimed
Great Britain, acquisition of provisional president of Mexi-

Canada and the Island of Cape
Breton, 7; maritime suprem-
acy, 15; ubiquitous agencies HAGUE conferences, arbitration
for obtaining information, 19; and mediation, 325-326; con-
war against the Netherlands, ventions, 434; proposal to
17; rule of war of 1756, 59; exempt private property at
peace of 1782, 29; treaties sea from capture, 61-65; call-
with, 33; retention of northern ing of second conference, 63;
posts, 34; Jay treaty, 56; vio- reservation by United States
lations of neutral rights, 56,

of American political ques-
59-61, 66, 67, 69, 77–81, 86, tions, 439, 440.
91-92; opposes exemption of Hague Court, North Atlantic
private property at sea from fisheries arbitration, 146;
capture, 63; trade with the award on Venezuelan blockade
Mediterranean, 105; trade ex- and preferential claims, 254.
cluded from Hanover, 60; ef- Haiti, intervention in, xi;
forts to suppress slave-trade, bitrations with, 322; Môle
116; protection of fur-seals and St. Nicolas, 364; instructions
sea-otters, 155; Hay-Paunce- to delegates to Panama Con-
fote treaties as to interoceanic gress, 374; special position in
canal, 125-126; treaty with Pan Americanism, 402; occu-
China,

176; alliance with pation by United States, 402-
Japan, 192-195; attitude tow- 404; recognition of, 422.
ards Holy Alliance, 239; ac- Hakan, case of, as to “block-
ceptance of Monroe Doctrine, ade,” 78–79.
251, 253; Venezuelan block- Halifax commission, 318.
ade, 253–255; law of allegiance, Hall, W. E., on American neu-
280, 281, 286; naturalization

trality, 46.
treaty with United States, Hamilton, Alexander, position
290, 291; extradition, 424.

as to Genêt's reception, 39,
Greeks, struggle for indepen- 40; neutrality circular, 46.
dence, 202.

Hannen, Lord, Bering Sea ar-
Grenville, Lord, negotiations with bitrator, 319.
Jay, 164, 308.

Hanover, law as to allegiance,
Gresham, "Walter Q., Secretary 281, 284; exclusion of British
of State, xv,

trade, 60.

ar-

Harding, Sir John Dorney, es- | Ingraham, Captain, demand for

cape of the Alabama, 52. release of Martin Koszta, 302.
Harlan, John M., Bering Sea Intercontinental railway, 389.
arbitrator, 318.

International American Confer-
Harris, Townsend, consul-gen- ence, First, 323, 386–389;

eral and minister to Japan, 189. plan of arbitration, 387–388;
Harrison, Benjamin, on “Com- Bureau of American Republics,

mittee of Secret Correspon- 388; Intercontinental railway,
dence," 6.

389; Republic of Brazil, 389;
Hay, John, Secretary of State, Second Conference, 327, 390;

xv; interoceanic canal treat- Third, 390–392; Fourth, 392;
ies, 125-126; memorandum

Fifth postponed, 387.
on Monroe Doctrine, 253; cir- International arbitration, 306–
cular of July 3, 1900, as to 348;., meaning of “arbitra-
China, 180.

tion,” 306, 326–327;

arbi-
Headland theory, 141, 143..

trations with Great Britain,
Hise, Elijah, treaty as to inter- 307-319; neutral rights and
oceanic canal, 123.

duties, 310-313, 332; power
Hoar, E. R., on joint high com- to determine jurisdiction, 311,
mission of 1871, 316.

312; treaty of Ghent, 314;
Holy Alliance, 238–240.

Geneva tribunal, 316; Halifax
Honduras, protests against treaty commission, 318; fur-seal ar-

between United States and bitration, 318, 319, 320; Alas-
Nicaragua, 401-402.

kan boundary commission,
Hongkong, acquired by England, 319-320,325; arbitrations with
176.

Spain, 321; France, 321; Mexi-
Honor, national, and arbitra- co, 321; Colombia, Costa Rica,
tion, 330, 337–338.

Denmark, Ecuador, Haiti, Nic-
Horse-shoe Reef, acquisition, 359. aragua, Paraguay, Peru, Por-
House of Commons, censure of tugal, Salvador, Santo Do-

Shelburne, 29; resolution on mingo, Siam, Venezuela, 322;
arbitration, 324-325.

summary, 322; public senti-
Hudson's Bay Company, arbi- ment, 323; Pan-American con-
tration of claims, 315.

ference, 323–324; resolution
Huerta, Victoriano, abandons of Congress (1890), 324; of

Madero, 216; President Wil- House of Commons (1893),
son's refusal to recognize, 217– 324; Olney-Pauncefote treaty,
225.

325; Hague conferences, 325,
Hungary, struggle for inde-

326, 329; Second Pan-Ameri-
pendence, 202.

can Conference, 327; errone-

ous impressions as to general
IMMIGRATION, Chinese, 182; Jap- progress, 329-335; Taft-Knox
anese, 191-192.

treaties, 334; future and limi-
Impressment, 61, 112-115, 275. tations, 337; instructions to
Independence of United States, delegates to Panama Con-
1, 2, 6, 13, 14, 36.

gress, 375; Chile-Colombian
Indians, pursuit of, 229.

treaty (1880), 385; plan adopt-
Indirect claims, 317.

ed by first International Amer.
Industrial property union, 434.

ican Conference, 387–388; pe-

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