Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

THE

BRITISH CRITIC,

FOR

FOR

JULY, AUGUST, SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER,

NOVEMBER, AND DECEMBER.

M DCC XCIX.

Non resort quam mulos libros, sed quam bonos habeas. SENECA.

VOLUME XIV.

London:

PRINTED FOR F. AND C. RIVINGTON,

ŅO. 62, ST. PAUL'S CHURCH-YARD.

1799.

PAINTED BY T. RICKABY, PETERBOROUGH COURT, FLPET-STREET.

PR E F A C E.

* TT matters not," says Seneca, “how many books

you have, but how good they are*." We are clearly of the same opinion, and therefore make a re. gular selection for our readers ; from which, if they select again, according to their various purposes, the advice of the old Ştoic will be sufficiently observed in their purchases : their shelves will not be loaded by number, but graced by value ; and, for the chasms left upon them, it would be better that they should be filled for a time by the carpenter, than too preci, pitately supplied by the dealers in paper and ink.

Divinity,

If an auspicious beginning were, in truth, as important as it was esteemed by the ancient world, we Should felicitate ourselves on being able to open our present Preface with the mention of a work so useful, and in all respeêts so yaluable, as the Elements of Chrifian Theologyt, lately published by the Bishop of Lincoln. To the student in Divinity it offers that clear and right introduction, which will throw a light on all his future labours; and as every member of the Church of England is, or ought to be, in some degree a ltudent of that kind, it stands ready as a faithful

See the motto to the present volume. * No. V. p. 465; VI. p. 610.

a ?

guide

guide to all. Very pleasing is it to observe, that, by the exemplary diligence now exerted for smoothing every avenue to sacred knowledge, gross ignorance of it will be soon without excuse ; we hope, almost. without example. Dr. Hey's Leatures in Divinity*, may be considered as a similar undertaking, on a more extended plan; but we forbear to characterize them further, till our account of them shall be completed. In the publication entitled Horæ Biblicæt, we see with satisfaction an eminent lawyer (Mr. Butler) holding out the torch to those who would explore the paths of biblical literature ; and holding it with a hand so steady and judicious, as almost to remove an obfcurity, which till then had baffled all but the profounder students of Theology. To the same class of sacred works belongs also, in a great measure, Mr. Kett's Interpreter of Prophecyf; of which the first 300 pages contain so excellent an abftrat of the Prophecies, as far as the destruction of Jerusalem, that they would alone form a cheap and most useful manual, separately printed, for those whom more obz scure enquiries might deter. The remainder offers matter well-worthy of contemplation to the theologian, but is less formed, excepting the conclusion, for general use. Two sets of Sermons at the Bampton Lecture, by Mr. Halls and Dr. Barrowl, contribute to enforce and illustrate the evidences of religion ; the foriner, by explaining the fulness and the fitness of the time when our Saviour appeared on earth; the latter, by discusling many topics which have been frequently thought pregnant with doubt or difficulty.

When we alligned the first place in this division to the Bishop of Lincoln's excellent book, to which we have subjoined such others as seemed more immediately to class with it, we did not forget or un

# No. V. p. 496. Sce allo vol. xiii, p. 600.

+ No. VI. p. 617.

No. II. p. 178.

I No. I. p. 27. No. III. p. 2846

dervalue

dervalue the Collation of the Septuagint; by Dr. Holmes: But original works seemed to claim the preference, especially as no more than the book of Genesis* has vet appeared. May the indefatigable and merito. rious editor proceed with equal success in the ensuing parts of his task!

There are still some important publications which demand our notice in this class : among which, we must by no means omit to mention the Sermons of the venerable Dr. Maclainet, the translator and judicious annotator of Mosheim. The subjects are important, whether general or temporary, and the manner in which they are treated evinces the united powers of an able writer and a powerful reasoner. The Supplement of Mr. Kingi, to his Remarks on the Signs of the Times, itself an edifying example of pious investigation, into a subject of general moment, gave occasion to the more profound and elaborate Disquisitions of the Bishop of Rochesters, where controverly appears disarmed of all its severity, and reconciled with politeness and friendship. Another work, in which the state of the times is particularly confidered, and a suitable discipline in religion prescribed, iš the Christian Monitor, by the Reu. 7. Owenll. In this the author labours diligently, and pleads ably, to recal the knowledge and the practice of the early periods of our national church; and as so many efforts are now conspiring towards the same end, it is reasonable to hope that they will produce a happy ef

fect.

Among the less extended productions in Divinity, the valuable Charge of the Bishop of Londong may juftly claim the foremost place: the character of practical utility strongly recommends it to the reader, while the spirit of genuine piety challenges his veneration for the writer. Never to be mentioned

Hrongly ruine pletyr to be

• No. III. p. 217, + No. IV. p. 386. $ Ib. 130. i No. VI. p. 660.

No. II. p. i 27. I No. III. p. 242.

, without

« AnteriorContinuar »