Theory and practice of homoeopathy: First part, containing a theory of homoeopathy, with dietetic rules, etc

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Henkle & Logan, printers, 1840 - 288 páginas
 

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Página 123 - Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty: For in my youth I never did apply Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood; Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo The means of weakness and debility; Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, Frosty, but kindly: let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man In all your business and necessities.
Página 148 - I will ask him for my place again ; he shall tell me I am a drunkard ! Had I as many mouths as Hydra, such an answer would stop them all. To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast ! O strange ! Every inordinate cup is unblessed and the ingredient is a devil.
Página 10 - They ask — and it must be confessed they ask with reason — what pledge can be afforded them, that the boasted remedies of the present day will not, like their predecessors, fall into disrepute, and in their turn serve only as humiliating memorials of the credulity and infatuation of the physicians who commended and prescribed them.
Página 147 - O thou invisible spirit of wine! if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil.
Página 169 - So the struck eagle, stretched upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, Viewed his own feather on the fatal dart, And winged the shaft that quivered in his heart ; Keen were his pangs, but keener far to feel He nursed the pinion which impelled the steel ; While the same plumage that had warmed his nest Drank the last life-drop of his bleeding breast.
Página 248 - For my name and memory, I leave it to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations, and the next ages.
Página 18 - As the historian of medicine approaches nearer to his own times, he finds his path encumbered with almost insurmountable difficulties. The subject on which he has to treat differs, perhaps, from every other branch of science in this circumstance, that our actual information does not increase, in any degree, in proportion to our experience. Hence it follows that the accumulation of materials frequently rather retards than promotes its progress. In other sciences, although truth is not to be attained...
Página ii - ... the right whereof he claims as author (or proprietor as the case may be;) in conformity with an act of Congress, entitled 'An act to amend the several acts respecting copyrights.
Página 173 - By chase our long-lived fathers earned their food ; Toil strung the nerves, and purified the blood ; But we their sons, a pamper'd race of men, Are dwindled down to threescore years and ten. Better to hunt in fields for health unbought Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise for cure on exercise depend : God never made his work for man to mend.
Página 169 - Twas thine own Genius gave the final blow, And helped to plant the wound that laid thee low : So the struck eagle, stretch'd upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, Viewed his own feather on the fatal dart, And winged the shaft that quivered in his heart...

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