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One level line along his spacious back;
Of full and ruddy eye, large ears, stretch'd head,
Nostrils dilated, breast and shoulders broad,
And spacious haunches, and a lofty dock.

Thus to their kindred soil and air induc'd, 225
Thy thriving herd will bless thy skilful care,
That copious Nature, who, in ev'ry change,
In each variety, with wisdom works,
And powers diversified of air and soil,
Her rich materials. Hence Sabæa's rocks, 230
Chaldæa's marle, Egyptus' water'd loam,
And dry Cyrene's sand, in climes alike,
With different stores supply the marts of trade :
Hence Zembla's icy tracks no bleaters hear :
Small are the Russian herds, and harsh their Fleece;
Of light esteem Germanic, far remote 236
From soft sea-breezes, open winters mild,
And summers bath'd in dew: on Syrian sheep
The costly burden only loads their tails :
No locks Cormandel's, none Malacca's, tribe 240
Adorn; but sleek of flix, and brown like deer,
Fearful and shepherdless, they bound along
The sands. No Fleeces wave in torrid climes,
Which verdure boast of trees and shrubs alone,
Shrubs aromatic, caufee wild, or thea, 245
Nutmeg, or cinnamon, or fiery clove,
Unapt to feed the Fleece. The food of wool
Is grass or herbage soft, that ever blooms
In temp?rate air, in the delicious downs
Of Albion, on the banks of all her streams. 250

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Of grasses are unnumber'd kinds, and all
(Save where foul water lingers on the turf)
Salubrious. Early mark when tepid gleams
Oft' mingle with the pearls of summer-show'rs,
And swell too hastily the tender plains; 255
Then snatch away thy sheep: beware the rot;
And with detersive bay-salt rub their mouths,
Or urge them on a barren bank to feed,
In hunger's kind distress, on tedded hay;
Or to the marish guide their easy steps, 260
If near thy tufted crofts the broad sea spreads,
Sagacious care foreacts. When strong disease
Breaks in, and stains the purple streams of health,
Hard is the strife of art. The coughing pest 264
From their green pasture sweeps whole flocks away.

That dire distemper sometimes may the swain,
Tho'late, discern; when on the lifted lid,
Or visual orb, the turgid veins are pale,
The swelling liver then her putrid store
Begins to drink: ev'n yet thy skill exert, 270
Nor suffer weak despair to fold thy arms :
Again detersive salt apply, or shed
The hoary med cine o'er their arid food.

In cold stiff soils the bleaters oft' complain
Of gouty ails, by shepherds term’d the Halt:

275
Those let the neighb’ring fold or ready crook
Detain, and pour into their cloven feet
Corrosive drugs, deep-searching arsenic,
Dry allum, verdigrise, or vitriol keen :

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'Twill serve to shift them to a dryer turf,
And salt again. Th’utility of salt
Teach thy slow swains : redundant humours cold
Are the diseases of the bleating kind.

Th’infectious scab, arising from extremes 285
Of want or surfeit, is by water cur'd
Of lime, or sodden stave-acre, or oil
Dispersive of Norwegian tar, renown'd
By virtuous Berkeley, whose benevolence.
Explor'd its pow'rs, and easy med’cine thence 290
Sought for the poor. Ye poor ! with grateful voice
Invoke eternal blessings on his head.

Sheep also pleurisies and dropsies know, Driv'n oft' from Nature's path by artful man, Who blindly turns aside, with haughty hand, 295 Whem sacred instinct would securely lead. But thou, more humble swain! thy rural gates Frequent unbar, and let thy flocks abroad From lea to croft, from mead to arid field, Nouing the fickle seasons of the sky.

300 Rain-sated pastures let them shun, and seek Changes of herbage and salubrious flowers, By their All-perfect Master inly taught, They best their food and physic can discern; For he, Supreme Existence! ever near, 305 Informs them. O'er the vivid green observe With what a regular consent they crop, At every fourth collection to the mouth, Unsav'ry crow-flow'r; whether to awake Languor of appetite with lively change,

310

Or timely to repel approaching ills,
Hard to determine. Thou, whom Nature loves,
And with her salutary rules intrusts,
Benevolent Mackenzie *! say the cause.
This truth howe'er shines bright to human sense:
Each strong affection of th’unconscious brute, 316
Each bent, each passion of the smallest mite,
Is wisely giv'n: harmonious they perform
The work of perfect reason, (blush, vain Man!)
And turn the wheels of Nature's vast machine. 320

See that thy scrip have store of healing tar,
And marking pitch and raddle; nor forget
Thy shears true pointed, nor th' officious dog,
Faithful to teach thy stragglers to return;
So may’st thou aid who lag along, or steal 325
Aside into the furrows or the shades,
Silent to droop; or who at ev'ry gate
Or hillock rub their sores and loosen'd wool.
But rather these, the feeble of thy flock,
Banish before th' autumnal months, Ev’n age 330
Forbear too much to favour : oft' renew,
And thro' thy fold let joyous youth appear.

Beware the season of imperial Love, Who turo' the world his ardent spirit pours; Ev'n sheep are then intrepid ! the proud ram 335 With jealous eye surveys the spacious field: All rivals keep aloof, or desp'rate war Suddenly rages; with impetuous force, And fury irresistible, they dash

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'Twill serve to shift them to a dryer turf,
And salt again. Th'utility of salt
Teach thy slow swains : redundant humours cold
Are the diseases of the bleating kind.

Th’infectious scab, arising from extremes 285
Of want or surfeit, is by water cur'd
Of line, or sodden stave-acre, or oil
Dispersive of Norwegian tar, renown'd
By virtuous Berkeley, whose benevolence.
Explor’d its pow’rs, and easy med’cine thence 293
Sought for the poor. Ye poor ! with grateful voice
Invoke eternal blessings on his head.

Sheep also pleurisies and dropsies know, Driv’n oft' from Nature's path by artful man, Who blindly turns aside, with haughty hand, 295 Whom sacred instinct would securely lead. But thou, more humble swain! thy rural gates Frequent unbar, and let thy flocks abroad From lea to croft, from mead to arid field, Noring the fickle seasons of the sky.

300 Rain-sated pastures let them shun, and seek Changes of herbage and salubrious flowers. By their All-perfe&t Master inly taught, i hey best their food and physic can discern; For he, Supreme Existence! ever near, 305 informs them. O'er the vivid green observe With what a regular consent they crop,

At every fourth collection to the mouth, Unsav'ry crow-flow'r; whether to awake Languor of appetite with lively change,

310

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