A Complete Guide to the Lakes, Comprising Minute Directions for the Tourist: With Mr. Wordsworth's Description of the Scenery of the Country, Etc.: and Five Letters on the Geology of the Lake District

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John Hudson (of Kendal)
J. Hudson, 1853 - 270 páginas
 

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Página 120 - Of mountain torrents ; or the visible scene Would enter unawares into his mind With all its solemn imagery, its rocks, Its woods, and that uncertain heaven, received Into the bosom of the steady lake.
Página 126 - There sometimes doth a leaping fish Send through the tarn a lonely cheer; The crags repeat the raven's croak, In symphony austere ; Thither the rainbow comes — the cloud — • And mists that spread the flying shroud ; And sunbeams ; and the sounding blast, That, if it could, would hurry past; But that enormous barrier binds it fast.
Página 102 - How nourished here through such long time He knows, who gave that love sublime ; And gave that strength of feeling, great Above all human estimate ! t 1805.
Página 74 - And flapping and rapping and clapping and slapping, And curling and whirling and purling and twirling, And thumping and plumping and bumping and jumping, And dashing and flashing and splashing and clashing; And so never ending, but always descending, Sounds and motions for ever and ever are blending All at once and all o'er, with a mighty uproar, — And this way the water comes down at Lodore.
Página 142 - Towards the head of these Dales was found a perfect Republic of Shepherds and Agriculturists, among whom the plough of each man was confined to the maintenance of his own family, or to the occasional accommodation of his neighbour. * Two or three cows furnished each family with milk and cheese. The Chapel was the only edifice that presided over these dwellings, the supreme head of this pure Commonwealth...
Página 69 - YE vales and hills whose beauty hither drew The poet's steps, and fixed him here, on you, His eyes have closed ! And ye, loved books, no more Shall Southey feed upon your precious lore, To works that ne'er shall forfeit their renown, Adding immortal labours of his own — Whether he traced historic truth, with zeal For the State's guidance, or the Church's weal, Or Fancy, disciplined by studious art...
Página 58 - ... in thy face a smile Though peaceful, full of gladness. Thou art pleased, Pleased with thy crags and woody steeps, thy Lake, Its one green island and its winding shores ; The multitude of little rocky hills, Thy Church and cottages of mountain stone Clustered like stars some few, but single most, And lurking dimly in their shy retreats, Or glancing at each other cheerful looks Like separated stars with clouds between.
Página 90 - There is a Yew-tree, pride of Lorton Vale, Which to this day stands single, in the midst Of its own darkness, as it stood of yore : Not loth to furnish weapons for the bands Of Umfraville or Percy ere they marched To Scotland's heaths ; or those that crossed the sea And drew their sounding bows at Azincour, Perhaps at earlier Crecy, or Poictiers.
Página 51 - Low and white, yet scarcely seen Are its walls, for mantling green, Not a window lets in light, But through flowers clustering bright; Not a glance may wander there, But it falls on something fair ; Garden choice, and fairy mound, Only that no elves are found ; Winding walk, and sheltered nook, For student grave, and graver book: Or a bird-like bower, perchance, Fit for maiden and romance. Then, far off, a glorious sheen Of wide and sun-lit waters seen; Hills, that in the distance lie, Blue and yielding...
Página 78 - With unrejoicing berries - ghostly Shapes May meet at noontide; Fear and trembling Hope, Silence and Foresight; Death the Skeleton And time the Shadow; - there to celebrate, As in a natural temple scattered o'er With altars undisturbed of mossy stone, United worship...

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