The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon: Including All His Occasional Works Namely Letters Speeches Tracts State Papers Memorials Devices and All Authentic Writings Not Already Printed Among His Philosophical Literary Or Professional Works, Volumen3

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1868

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Página 122 - I will have one doctrine, one discipline, one religion in substance and ceremony: never speak more to that point, how far you are bound to obey.
Página 141 - ... if you had my Lord of Essex here with a white staff in his hand, as my Lord of Leicester had, and continued him still about you for society to yourself, and for an honour and ornament to your attendance and court, in the eyes of your people, and in the eyes of foreign ambassadors, then were he in his right element; for to discontent him as you do, and yet to put arms and power into his hands, may be a kind of temptation to make him prove cumbersome and unruly.
Página 81 - For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth...
Página 154 - ... and after it was set to print, the queen, who, as your lordship knoweth, as she was excellent in great matters, so she was exquisite in small, and noted that I could not forget my ancient respect to my Lord of Essex, in terming him ever my Lord of Essex, my Lord of Essex, almost in every page of the book, which she thought not fit, but would have it made Essex, or the late Earl of Essex : whereupon of force it was printed "de novo," and the first copies suppressed by her peremptory commandment.
Página 99 - ... conduct them ; a just ground I say it is of deliberation, but not of direction. But on the other side, who knoweth not that time is truly compared to a stream, that carrieth down fresh and pure waters into that salt sea of corruption which environeth all human actions? And therefore if man shall not by his industry, virtue, and policy, as it were with the oar row against the stream and inclination of time, all institutions and ordinances, be they never so pure, will corrupt and degenerate.
Página 80 - But above all, if a man could succeed, not in striking out some particular invention, however useful, but in kindling a light in nature— a light which should in its very rising touch and illuminate all the border-regions that confine upon the circle of our present knowledge; and so spreading further and further should presently disclose and bring into sight all that is most hidden and secret in the world...
Página 247 - Multum incolafiiit anima mea, than myself. For I do confess, since I was of any understanding, my mind hath in effect been absent from that I have done ; and in absence are many errors3 which I do willingly acknowledge; and amongst the rest this great one that led the rest ; that knowing myself by inward calling to be fitter to hold a book than to play a part, I have led my life in civil causes ; for which I was not very fit by nature, and more unfit by the preoccupation of my mind.
Página ix - CERTAIN CONSIDERATIONS TOUCHING THE BETTER PACIFICATION AND EDIFICATION OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND.
Página 73 - ... not by any fashions of his own. He is thought somewhat general in his favours ; and his virtue of access is rather because he is much abroad and in press than that he giveth easy audience. He hasteneth to a mixture of both kingdoms and occasions, faster perhaps than policy will well bear.
Página 148 - That because it was considered how I stood tied to my lord of Essex, therefore that part was thought fittest for me, which did him least hurt ; for that whereas all the rest was matter of charge and accusation, this only was but matter of caveat and admonition.

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