Four Centuries of English Letters: Selections from the Correspondence of One Hundred and Fifty Writers from the Period of the Paston Letters to the Present Day

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William Baptiste Scoones
Harper & Bros., 1880 - 573 páginas

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Página 43 - I hope I shall not be found to have the troubled fountain of a corrupt heart, in a depraved habit of taking rewards to pervert justice; howsoever I may be frail, and partake of the abuses of the times.
Página 239 - Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any favourer of learning, I shall not be disappointed though I should conclude it, if less be possible, with less; for I have been long wakened from that dream of hope, in which I once boasted myself with so much exultation, my Lord, your Lordship's most humble, most obedient servant, 'SAM JOHNSON.
Página 298 - I have written a hundred letters to different friends in your country, and never received an answer from any of them. I do not know how to account for this, or why they are unwilling to keep up for me those regards which I must ever retain for them.
Página 517 - ... delivered. 7 Our help standeth in the Name of the Lord : who hath made heaven and earth. Psal. cxxv. Qui confidant. HEY that put their trust in the Lord shall be even as the mount Sion : which may not be removed, but standeth fast for ever. 2 The hills stand about Jerusalem : even so standeth the Lord round about his people, from this time forth for evermore.
Página 195 - As to the latter, I desire you to read over the Text, and make a few in any way you like best2 ; whether dry raillery, upon the style and way of commenting of trivial Critics ; or humorous, upon the authors in the poem ; or historical, of persons, places, times ; or explanatory ; or collecting the parallel passages of the Ancients.
Página 310 - I tell you again, — that the recollection of the manner in which I saw the queen of France, in the year 1774, and the contrast between that brilliancy, splendour, and beauty, with the prostrate homage of a nation to her, — and the abominable scene of 1789, which I was describing, — did draw tears from me, and wetted my paper. These tears came again into my eyes, almost as often as I looked at the description ; they may again.
Página 41 - ... than myself; for, I do confess, since I was of any understanding, my mind hath in effect been absent from that I have done ; and in absence are many errors, which I do willingly acknowledge ; and, amongst the rest, this great one that led the rest ; that knowing myself by inward calling to be. fitter to hold a book, than to play a part, I have led my life in civil causes ; for which I was not very fit by nature, and more unfit by the pre-occupation of my mind.
Página 509 - We are all Greeks. Our laws, our literature, our religion, our arts, have their root in Greece. But for Greece — Rome, the instructor, the conqueror, or the metropolis, of our ancestors, would have spread no illumination with her arms, and we might still have been savages and idolaters...
Página 521 - I think if I had a free and healthy and lasting organisation of heart, and lungs as strong as an ox's so as to be able to bear unhurt the shock of extreme thought and sensation without weariness, I could pass my life very nearly alone though it should last eighty years. But I feel my body too weak to support me to the height, I am obliged continually to check myself, and be nothing.

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