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Oib. Ay.

Exter Lodovico, Cafio brought in ; Montano, with Orb. O fool! fool! fool! lago, prisoner ; and Officers.

(af. There is, besues, in Roderigo's letter, Lod. Where is this raih and most unfortunate How he upbraids Iago, that he made him man ?

Brave me upon the watch; whereon it came Ork. That's he that was Othello ; here I am. That I was calt: And even but now he spake, Lod. Where is chat viper ? bring the villain | After long seeming dead, --Iago hurt him, forth. lago let him on.

[us : Oib. I look down towards his feet? ;--but that's Lod. You must forsake this room, and go with a fable.

Your power and your command is caken off, If that thou be'st a devil, I cannot kill thee. And Cullio rules in Cyprus. For this Nave,

[Orbello wounds lago. If there be any cunning cruelty, Lod. Wrench his sword from him.

That can torment bim much, and hold him long, lago. I bleed, fir; but not kill'd.

It thall be his : You shall close prisoner rett, Orb. I am not sorry neither ; I'd have thee live; / 'Till that the nature of your fault be known For, in my fenfe, 'tis happiness to die.

To the Venetian state --Come, bring him away. Lord. O thou Othello, that wast once so good, Oih. Suft you ; a word or two, before you go Fall’n in the practice 2 of a cursed llave, I have done the state some service, and they What Thall be said to thee?

know it; Orb. Why, any thing :

No more of that :--I pray you, in your letters, An honourab!e murderer, if you will ;

When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, * For nought I did in hate, but all in honour. Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuite, Lod. This wretch hath part confess'd his Nor set down aught in malice: then must you speak villainy :

Of one, chat lov'd not wisely, but too well; Did you and le consent in Callio's death? Of one, not easily jealous, but, being wrought,

Perplex'd in the extreme; of one, whose hand, Caf. Dear general, I never gave you cause. Like the base Judican", threw a pearl away

Oth. I do believe it, and I ask your pardon. Richer than all his cribe ; of one, whole Yubdu'd Will you, I pray, demand that demi-devil,

eyes,
Why he hath thus ensnar'd my soul and body? Albeit unused to the melting mood,
layo. Demand me nothing : What you know, Drop tears as fast as the Arabian trees
you know :

Their medicinable gunı : Set you down this :
From this time forth I never will speak word. And say, b=fides,-ihat in Aleppo once,
Lod. What ? not to pray ?

Where a malignant and a turband Turk
Gra. Torments will ope your lips.

Beat a Venecian, and traduc'd the state, Oth. Well, thou doit beit.

I took by the throat the circumcised dog, Lod. Sir, you shall understand what hath befall’n, And (mote him—thus.

[Stubs himself. Which, as I think, you know not: Here is a Lod. O bloody period ! letter,

Gra. All, that is spoke, is marr'd. Found in the pocket of the Nain Roderigo;

0:b. I kiss'd thee, 'ere I kill'd thee ;-No way And here, another ; the one of them imports

but this, (Falling upon Desdemona The death of Callio to be undertook

Killing myself, tu die upon a kiss. (Dick By Roderigo.

Caf. This did I fear, but thought he had 120 Orb. () villain !

weapon ;
Caf. Molt heathenish, and most gross ! For he was great of heart.

Lod. Now here's another discontented paper, Lod. ( Spartan dog 4,
Found in his pocket too; and this, it seems, More fell than anguish, hunger, or the sea !
Roderigo meant to have sent this damned villain; Look on the tragic loading of this bed ; [10 lago.
But that, belike, lago in the interim

This is thy work: the object poisons right ;-
Came in and satisfied him.

Let it be hid.Gratiano, keep the house,
Oib. O the pernicious caitiff -

And seize upon the fortunes of the Moor,
How came you, Caffio, by that handkerchief For they succeed on you.—To you, lord governory
That was my wife's?

Remains the censures of this hellith villain ;
Cuf: I found it in my chamber :

The time, the place, the torture,- inforce it! And he himself confeís’d, but even now, Myielf will straight aboard ; and, to the state, That there he dropp'd it for a special purpose, This heavy act with heavy heart relate. [Exeunt. Which wrought to his desire.

i To see if, according to the common opinion, his feet be cloven. 2 i. e. in the fnare, by the fratagon. 3 By the Judian (which is the reading of the elder quarto, and adopted by Theobald and Warburton), the latter says, is meant Herod, whole usage to Mariamne is so apposite to the speaker's case, that a more proper instance could not be thought of. Besides, he was the subject of a tragedy at that time, as appears from the words in Hamlet, where an ill player is described, out-herod Herod." The inetaphorical term of a pearl for a finc woman, is so common as frarce to necd examples. 4 The dogs of Spartan race, says Hanmer, were reconed among those of the mod fierce and lavage kind. s i. c. the fevtence.

FINI S.

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